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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 247 pages of information about The Scarlet Letter.

Full of concern, therefore—­but so conscious of her own right that it seemed scarcely an unequal match between the public on the one side, and a lonely woman, backed by the sympathies of nature, on the other—­Hester Prynne set forth from her solitary cottage.  Little Pearl, of course, was her companion.  She was now of an age to run lightly along by her mother’s side, and, constantly in motion from morn till sunset, could have accomplished a much longer journey than that before her.  Often, nevertheless, more from caprice than necessity, she demanded to be taken up in arms; but was soon as imperious to be let down again, and frisked onward before Hester on the grassy pathway, with many a harmless trip and tumble.  We have spoken of Pearl’s rich and luxuriant beauty—­a beauty that shone with deep and vivid tints, a bright complexion, eyes possessing intensity both of depth and glow, and hair already of a deep, glossy brown, and which, in after years, would be nearly akin to black.  There was fire in her and throughout her:  she seemed the unpremeditated offshoot of a passionate moment.  Her mother, in contriving the child’s garb, had allowed the gorgeous tendencies of her imagination their full play, arraying her in a crimson velvet tunic of a peculiar cut, abundantly embroidered in fantasies and flourishes of gold thread.  So much strength of colouring, which must have given a wan and pallid aspect to cheeks of a fainter bloom, was admirably adapted to Pearl’s beauty, and made her the very brightest little jet of flame that ever danced upon the earth.

But it was a remarkable attribute of this garb, and indeed, of the child’s whole appearance, that it irresistibly and inevitably reminded the beholder of the token which Hester Prynne was doomed to wear upon her bosom.  It was the scarlet letter in another form:  the scarlet letter endowed with life!  The mother herself—­as if the red ignominy were so deeply scorched into her brain that all her conceptions assumed its form—­had carefully wrought out the similitude, lavishing many hours of morbid ingenuity to create an analogy between the object of her affection and the emblem of her guilt and torture.  But, in truth, Pearl was the one as well as the other; and only in consequence of that identity had Hester contrived so perfectly to represent the scarlet letter in her appearance.

As the two wayfarers came within the precincts of the town, the children of the Puritans looked up from their play,—­or what passed for play with those sombre little urchins—­and spoke gravely one to another.

“Behold, verily, there is the woman of the scarlet letter:  and of a truth, moreover, there is the likeness of the scarlet letter running along by her side!  Come, therefore, and let us fling mud at them!”

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