The Scarlet Letter eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 302 pages of information about The Scarlet Letter.

It might be, too—­doubtless it was so, although she hid the secret from herself, and grew pale whenever it struggled out of her heart, like a serpent from its hole—­it might be that another feeling kept her within the scene and pathway that had been so fatal.  There dwelt, there trode, the feet of one with whom she deemed herself connected in a union that, unrecognised on earth, would bring them together before the bar of final judgment, and make that their marriage-altar, for a joint futurity of endless retribution.  Over and over again, the tempter of souls had thrust this idea upon Hester’s contemplation, and laughed at the passionate and desperate joy with which she seized, and then strove to cast it from her.  She barely looked the idea in the face, and hastened to bar it in its dungeon.  What she compelled herself to believe—­what, finally, she reasoned upon as her motive for continuing a resident of New England—­was half a truth, and half a self-delusion.  Here, she said to herself had been the scene of her guilt, and here should be the scene of her earthly punishment; and so, perchance, the torture of her daily shame would at length purge her soul, and work out another purity than that which she had lost:  more saint-like, because the result of martyrdom.

Hester Prynne, therefore, did not flee.  On the outskirts of the town, within the verge of the peninsula, but not in close vicinity to any other habitation, there was a small thatched cottage.  It had been built by an earlier settler, and abandoned, because the soil about it was too sterile for cultivation, while its comparative remoteness put it out of the sphere of that social activity which already marked the habits of the emigrants.  It stood on the shore, looking across a basin of the sea at the forest-covered hills, towards the west.  A clump of scrubby trees, such as alone grew on the peninsula, did not so much conceal the cottage from view, as seem to denote that here was some object which would fain have been, or at least ought to be, concealed.  In this little lonesome dwelling, with some slender means that she possessed, and by the licence of the magistrates, who still kept an inquisitorial watch over her, Hester established herself, with her infant child.  A mystic shadow of suspicion immediately attached itself to the spot.  Children, too young to comprehend wherefore this woman should be shut out from the sphere of human charities, would creep nigh enough to behold her plying her needle at the cottage-window, or standing in the doorway, or labouring in her little garden, or coming forth along the pathway that led townward, and, discerning the scarlet letter on her breast, would scamper off with a strange contagious fear.

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The Scarlet Letter from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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