The Scarlet Letter eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 247 pages of information about The Scarlet Letter.

He started at a thought that suddenly occurred to him.

“Hester!” cried he, “here is a new horror!  Roger Chillingworth knows your purpose to reveal his true character.  Will he continue, then, to keep our secret?  What will now be the course of his revenge?”

“There is a strange secrecy in his nature,” replied Hester, thoughtfully; “and it has grown upon him by the hidden practices of his revenge.  I deem it not likely that he will betray the secret.  He will doubtless seek other means of satiating his dark passion.”

“And I!—­how am I to live longer, breathing the same air with this deadly enemy?” exclaimed Arthur Dimmesdale, shrinking within himself, and pressing his hand nervously against his heart—­a gesture that had grown involuntary with him.  “Think for me, Hester!  Thou art strong.  Resolve for me!”

“Thou must dwell no longer with this man,” said Hester, slowly and firmly.  “Thy heart must be no longer under his evil eye!”

“It were far worse than death!” replied the minister.  “But how to avoid it?  What choice remains to me?  Shall I lie down again on these withered leaves, where I cast myself when thou didst tell me what he was?  Must I sink down there, and die at once?”

“Alas! what a ruin has befallen thee!” said Hester, with the tears gushing into her eyes.  “Wilt thou die for very weakness?  There is no other cause!”

“The judgment of God is on me,” answered the conscience-stricken priest.  “It is too mighty for me to struggle with!”

“Heaven would show mercy,” rejoined Hester, “hadst thou but the strength to take advantage of it.”

“Be thou strong for me!” answered he.  “Advise me what to do.”

“Is the world, then, so narrow?” exclaimed Hester Prynne, fixing her deep eyes on the minister’s, and instinctively exercising a magnetic power over a spirit so shattered and subdued that it could hardly hold itself erect.  “Doth the universe lie within the compass of yonder town, which only a little time ago was but a leaf-strewn desert, as lonely as this around us?  Whither leads yonder forest-track?  Backward to the settlement, thou sayest!  Yes; but, onward, too!  Deeper it goes, and deeper into the wilderness, less plainly to be seen at every step; until some few miles hence the yellow leaves will show no vestige of the white man’s tread.  There thou art free!  So brief a journey would bring thee from a world where thou hast been most wretched, to one where thou mayest still be happy!  Is there not shade enough in all this boundless forest to hide thy heart from the gaze of Roger Chillingworth?”

“Yes, Hester; but only under the fallen leaves!” replied the minister, with a sad smile.

“Then there is the broad pathway of the sea!” continued Hester.  “It brought thee hither.  If thou so choose, it will bear thee back again.  In our native land, whether in some remote rural village, or in vast London—­or, surely, in Germany, in France, in pleasant Italy—­thou wouldst be beyond his power and knowledge!  And what hast thou to do with all these iron men, and their opinions?  They have kept thy better part in bondage too long already!”

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Project Gutenberg
The Scarlet Letter from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.