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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 247 pages of information about The Scarlet Letter.

When her elf-child had departed, Hester Prynne made a step or two towards the track that led through the forest, but still remained under the deep shadow of the trees.  She beheld the minister advancing along the path entirely alone, and leaning on a staff which he had cut by the wayside.  He looked haggard and feeble, and betrayed a nerveless despondency in his air, which had never so remarkably characterised him in his walks about the settlement, nor in any other situation where he deemed himself liable to notice.  Here it was wofully visible, in this intense seclusion of the forest, which of itself would have been a heavy trial to the spirits.  There was a listlessness in his gait, as if he saw no reason for taking one step further, nor felt any desire to do so, but would have been glad, could he be glad of anything, to fling himself down at the root of the nearest tree, and lie there passive for evermore.  The leaves might bestrew him, and the soil gradually accumulate and form a little hillock over his frame, no matter whether there were life in it or no.  Death was too definite an object to be wished for or avoided.

To Hester’s eye, the Reverend Mr. Dimmesdale exhibited no symptom of positive and vivacious suffering, except that, as little Pearl had remarked, he kept his hand over his heart.

XVII.  THE PASTOR AND HIS PARISHIONER

Slowly as the minister walked, he had almost gone by before Hester Prynne could gather voice enough to attract his observation.  At length she succeeded.

“Arthur Dimmesdale!” she said, faintly at first, then louder, but hoarsely—­“Arthur Dimmesdale!”

“Who speaks?” answered the minister.  Gathering himself quickly up, he stood more erect, like a man taken by surprise in a mood to which he was reluctant to have witnesses.  Throwing his eyes anxiously in the direction of the voice, he indistinctly beheld a form under the trees, clad in garments so sombre, and so little relieved from the gray twilight into which the clouded sky and the heavy foliage had darkened the noontide, that he knew not whether it were a woman or a shadow.  It may be that his pathway through life was haunted thus by a spectre that had stolen out from among his thoughts.

He made a step nigher, and discovered the scarlet letter.

“Hester!  Hester Prynne!”, said he; “is it thou?  Art thou in life?”

“Even so.” she answered.  “In such life as has been mine these seven years past!  And thou, Arthur Dimmesdale, dost thou yet live?”

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