The Valley of Fear eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 171 pages of information about The Valley of Fear.

McMurdo listened at the door of the lonely house; but all was still within.  Then he leaned the powder bag against it, ripped a hole in it with his knife, and attached the fuse.  When it was well alight he and his two companions took to their heels, and were some distance off, safe and snug in a sheltering ditch, before the shattering roar of the explosion, with the low, deep rumble of the collapsing building, told them that their work was done.  No cleaner job had ever been carried out in the bloodstained annals of the society.

But alas that work so well organized and boldly carried out should all have gone for nothing!  Warned by the fate of the various victims, and knowing that he was marked down for destruction, Chester Wilcox had moved himself and his family only the day before to some safer and less known quarters, where a guard of police should watch over them.  It was an empty house which had been torn down by the gunpowder, and the grim old colour sergeant of the war was still teaching discipline to the miners of Iron Dike.

“Leave him to me,” said McMurdo.  “He’s my man, and I’ll get him sure if I have to wait a year for him.”

A vote of thanks and confidence was passed in full lodge, and so for the time the matter ended.  When a few weeks later it was reported in the papers that Wilcox had been shot at from an ambuscade, it was an open secret that McMurdo was still at work upon his unfinished job.

Such were the methods of the Society of Freemen, and such were the deeds of the Scowrers by which they spread their rule of fear over the great and rich district which was for so long a period haunted by their terrible presence.  Why should these pages be stained by further crimes?  Have I not said enough to show the men and their methods?

These deeds are written in history, and there are records wherein one may read the details of them.  There one may learn of the shooting of Policemen Hunt and Evans because they had ventured to arrest two members of the society—­a double outrage planned at the Vermissa lodge and carried out in cold blood upon two helpless and disarmed men.  There also one may read of the shooting of Mrs. Larbey when she was nursing her husband, who had been beaten almost to death by orders of Boss McGinty.  The killing of the elder Jenkins, shortly followed by that of his brother, the mutilation of James Murdoch, the blowing up of the Staphouse family, and the murder of the Stendals all followed hard upon one another in the same terrible winter.

Darkly the shadow lay upon the Valley of Fear.  The spring had come with running brooks and blossoming trees.  There was hope for all Nature bound so long in an iron grip; but nowhere was there any hope for the men and women who lived under the yoke of the terror.  Never had the cloud above them been so dark and hopeless as in the early summer of the year 1875.

Chapter 6 — Danger

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The Valley of Fear from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.