The Valley of Fear eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 171 pages of information about The Valley of Fear.

“Where’s your warrant?” asked McGinty.  “By Gar! a man might as well live in Russia as in Vermissa while folk like you are running the police.  It’s a capitalist outrage, and you’ll hear more of it, I reckon.”

“You do what you think is your duty the best way you can, Councillor.  We’ll look after ours.”

“What am I accused of?” asked McMurdo.

“Of being concerned in the beating of old Editor Stanger at the Herald office.  It wasn’t your fault that it isn’t a murder charge.”

“Well, if that’s all you have against him,” cried McGinty with a laugh, “you can save yourself a deal of trouble by dropping it right now.  This man was with me in my saloon playing poker up to midnight, and I can bring a dozen to prove it.”

“That’s your affair, and I guess you can settle it in court to-morrow.  Meanwhile, come on, McMurdo, and come quietly if you don’t want a gun across your head.  You stand wide, Mr. McGinty; for I warn you I will stand no resistance when I am on duty!”

So determined was the appearance of the captain that both McMurdo and his boss were forced to accept the situation.  The latter managed to have a few whispered words with the prisoner before they parted.

“What about—­” he jerked his thumb upward to signify the coining plant.

“All right,” whispered McMurdo, who had devised a safe hiding place under the floor.

“I’ll bid you good-bye,” said the Boss, shaking hands.  “I’ll see Reilly the lawyer and take the defense upon myself.  Take my word for it that they won’t be able to hold you.”

“I wouldn’t bet on that.  Guard the prisoner, you two, and shoot him if he tries any games.  I’ll search the house before I leave.”

He did so; but apparently found no trace of the concealed plant.  When he had descended he and his men escorted McMurdo to headquarters.  Darkness had fallen, and a keen blizzard was blowing so that the streets were nearly deserted; but a few loiterers followed the group, and emboldened by invisibility shouted imprecations at the prisoner.

“Lynch the cursed Scowrer!” they cried.  “Lynch him!” They laughed and jeered as he was pushed into the police station.  After a short, formal examination from the inspector in charge he was put into the common cell.  Here he found Baldwin and three other criminals of the night before, all arrested that afternoon and waiting their trial next morning.

But even within this inner fortress of the law the long arm of the Freemen was able to extend.  Late at night there came a jailer with a straw bundle for their bedding, out of which he extracted two bottles of whisky, some glasses, and a pack of cards.  They spent a hilarious night, without an anxious thought as to the ordeal of the morning.

Nor had they cause, as the result was to show.  The magistrate could not possibly, on the evidence, have held them for a higher court.  On the one hand the compositors and pressmen were forced to admit that the light was uncertain, that they were themselves much perturbed, and that it was difficult for them to swear to the identity of the assailants; although they believed that the accused were among them.  Cross examined by the clever attorney who had been engaged by McGinty, they were even more nebulous in their evidence.

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The Valley of Fear from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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