The Valley of Fear eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 171 pages of information about The Valley of Fear.

Those were the early days at the end of the ’80’s, when Alec MacDonald was far from having attained the national fame which he has now achieved.  He was a young but trusted member of the detective force, who had distinguished himself in several cases which had been intrusted to him.  His tall, bony figure gave promise of exceptional physical strength, while his great cranium and deep-set, lustrous eyes spoke no less clearly of the keen intelligence which twinkled out from behind his bushy eyebrows.  He was a silent, precise man with a dour nature and a hard Aberdonian accent.

Twice already in his career had Holmes helped him to attain success, his own sole reward being the intellectual joy of the problem.  For this reason the affection and respect of the Scotchman for his amateur colleague were profound, and he showed them by the frankness with which he consulted Holmes in every difficulty.  Mediocrity knows nothing higher than itself; but talent instantly recognizes genius, and MacDonald had talent enough for his profession to enable him to perceive that there was no humiliation in seeking the assistance of one who already stood alone in Europe, both in his gifts and in his experience.  Holmes was not prone to friendship, but he was tolerant of the big Scotchman, and smiled at the sight of him.

“You are an early bird, Mr. Mac,” said he.  “I wish you luck with your worm.  I fear this means that there is some mischief afoot.”

“If you said ‘hope’ instead of ‘fear,’ it would be nearer the truth, I’m thinking, Mr. Holmes,” the inspector answered, with a knowing grin.  “Well, maybe a wee nip would keep out the raw morning chill.  No, I won’t smoke, I thank you.  I’ll have to be pushing on my way; for the early hours of a case are the precious ones, as no man knows better than your own self.  But—­but—­”

The inspector had stopped suddenly, and was staring with a look of absolute amazement at a paper upon the table.  It was the sheet upon which I had scrawled the enigmatic message.

“Douglas!” he stammered.  “Birlstone!  What’s this, Mr. Holmes?  Man, it’s witchcraft!  Where in the name of all that is wonderful did you get those names?”

“It is a cipher that Dr. Watson and I have had occasion to solve.  But why—­what’s amiss with the names?”

The inspector looked from one to the other of us in dazed astonishment.  “Just this,” said he, “that Mr. Douglas of Birlstone Manor House was horribly murdered last night!”

Chapter 2 — Sherlock Holmes Discourses

It was one of those dramatic moments for which my friend existed.  It would be an overstatement to say that he was shocked or even excited by the amazing announcement.  Without having a tinge of cruelty in his singular composition, he was undoubtedly callous from long overstimulation.  Yet, if his emotions were dulled, his intellectual perceptions were exceedingly active.  There was no trace then of the horror which I had myself felt at this curt declaration; but his face showed rather the quiet and interested composure of the chemist who sees the crystals falling into position from his oversaturated solution.

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
The Valley of Fear from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.