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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 4,784 pages of information about Complete Project Gutenberg John Galsworthy Works.

Suddenly she saw him, and her face changed.

“Any letters for me?” he said.

“Three.”

He stood aside, and without another word she passed on into the bedroom.

CHAPTER VII

OLD JOLYON’S PECCADILLO

Old Jolyon came out of Lord’s cricket ground that same afternoon with the intention of going home.  He had not reached Hamilton Terrace before he changed his mind, and hailing a cab, gave the driver an address in Wistaria Avenue.  He had taken a resolution.

June had hardly been at home at all that week; she had given him nothing of her company for a long time past, not, in fact, since she had become engaged to Bosinney.  He never asked her for her company.  It was not his habit to ask people for things!  She had just that one idea now—­Bosinney and his affairs—­and she left him stranded in his great house, with a parcel of servants, and not a soul to speak to from morning to night.  His Club was closed for cleaning; his Boards in recess; there was nothing, therefore, to take him into the City.  June had wanted him to go away; she would not go herself, because Bosinney was in London.

But where was he to go by himself?  He could not go abroad alone; the sea upset his liver; he hated hotels.  Roger went to a hydropathic—­he was not going to begin that at his time of life, those new-fangled places we’re all humbug!

With such formulas he clothed to himself the desolation of his spirit; the lines down his face deepening, his eyes day by day looking forth with the melancholy which sat so strangely on a face wont to be strong and serene.

And so that afternoon he took this journey through St. John’s Wood, in the golden-light that sprinkled the rounded green bushes of the acacia’s before the little houses, in the summer sunshine that seemed holding a revel over the little gardens; and he looked about him with interest; for this was a district which no Forsyte entered without open disapproval and secret curiosity.

His cab stopped in front of a small house of that peculiar buff colour which implies a long immunity from paint.  It had an outer gate, and a rustic approach.

He stepped out, his bearing extremely composed; his massive head, with its drooping moustache and wings of white hair, very upright, under an excessively large top hat; his glance firm, a little angry.  He had been driven into this!

“Mrs. Jolyon Forsyte at home?”

“Oh, yes sir!—­what name shall I say, if you please, sir?”

Old Jolyon could not help twinkling at the little maid as he gave his name.  She seemed to him such a funny little toad!

And he followed her through the dark hall, into a small double, drawing-room, where the furniture was covered in chintz, and the little maid placed him in a chair.

“They’re all in the garden, sir; if you’ll kindly take a seat, I’ll tell them.”

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