Complete Project Gutenberg John Galsworthy Works eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 4,784 pages of information about Complete Project Gutenberg John Galsworthy Works.
melancholy on his thin, high-cheekboned face upturned towards her window.  Then, to her dismay, she saw that the flame had really caught, and, suddenly persuaded that he had some crazy intention of injuring himself with the view, perhaps, of attracting her attention, she ran out of her room and down the stairs, and emerging from the back door just as she was, circled her garden, so that she might enter Mr. Lavender’s garden from behind him, ready for any eventuality.  She arrived within arm’s reach of him without his having heard her, for Blink, whose anxious face as she watched her master wasting, could be discerned at the bedroom-window, was whining, and Mr. Lavender himself had now broken into a strange and lamentable chantey, which, in combination with the creeping flutter of the flames in the weekly journals encircling the base of the funeral pyre, well-nigh made her blood curdle.

“Aurora,” sang Mr. Lavender, in that most dolorous voice,

     “Aurora, my heart I bring,
     For I know well it will not burn,
     Oh! when the leaves puff out in Spring
     And when the leaves in Autumn turn
        Think, think of me! 
     Aurora, I pass away! 
     Upon my horse of air I ride;
     Here let my grizzled ashes stay,
     But take, ah! take my heart inside! 
        Aurora!  Aurora!”

At this moment, just as a fit of the most uncontrollable laughter was about to seize her, she saw a flame which had just consumed the word Horatio reach Mr. Lavender’s right calf.

“Oh!” he cried out in desperate tones, stretching up his arms to the sky.  “Now is my hour come!  Sweet-sky, open and let me see her face!  Behold! behold her with the eyes of faith.  It is enough.  Courage, brother; let me now consume in silence!” So saying, he folded his arm tightly across his breast and closed his lips.  The flame rising to the bottom of the weekly which had indeed been upside down, here nipped him vigorously, so that with a wholly unconscious movement he threw up his little legs, and, losing his balance, fell backwards into the arms of Aurora, watchfully outstretched to receive him.  Uplifted there, close to that soft blue bosom away from the reek of the flame, he conceived that he was consumed and had passed already from his night of ghosts and shadows into the arms of the morning, and through his swooning lips came forth the words: 

“I am in Paradise.”

The end.

FIVE TALES

by John Galsworthy

“Life calls the tune, we dance.”

CONTENTS: 

THE FIRST AND LAST THE FIRST AND LAST

A STOIC A STOIC

THE APPLE TREE THE APPLE TREE

THE JURYMAN THE JURYMAN

Indian summer of A Forsyte [Also posted as Etext #2594]

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
Complete Project Gutenberg John Galsworthy Works from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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