Leviathan eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 636 pages of information about Leviathan.

It was not therefore a very difficult matter, for Henry 8. by his Exorcisme; nor for Qu.  Elizabeth by hers, to cast them out.  But who knows that this Spirit of Rome, now gone out, and walking by Missions through the dry places of China, Japan, and the Indies, that yeeld him little fruit, may not return, or rather an Assembly of Spirits worse than he, enter, and inhabite this clean swept house, and make the End thereof worse than the beginning?  For it is not the Romane Clergy onely, that pretends the Kingdome of God to be of this World, and thereby to have a Power therein, distinct from that of the Civill State.  And this is all I had a designe to say, concerning the Doctrine of the Politiques.  Which when I have reviewed, I shall willingly expose it to the censure of my Countrey.

A REVIEW, AND CONCLUSION

From the contrariety of some of the Naturall Faculties of the Mind, one to another, as also of one Passion to another, and from their reference to Conversation, there has been an argument taken, to inferre an impossibility that any one man should be sufficiently disposed to all sorts of Civill duty.  The Severity of Judgment, they say, makes men Censorious, and unapt to pardon the Errours and Infirmities of other men:  and on the other side, Celerity of Fancy, makes the thoughts lesse steddy than is necessary, to discern exactly between Right and Wrong.  Again, in all Deliberations, and in all Pleadings, the faculty of solid Reasoning, is necessary:  for without it, the Resolutions of men are rash, and their Sentences unjust:  and yet if there be not powerfull Eloquence, which procureth attention and Consent, the effect of Reason will be little.  But these are contrary Faculties; the former being grounded upon principles of Truth; the other upon Opinions already received, true, or false; and upon the Passions and Interests of men, which are different, and mutable.

And amongst the Passions, Courage, (by which I mean the Contempt of Wounds, and violent Death) enclineth men to private Revenges, and sometimes to endeavour the unsetling of the Publique Peace; And Timorousnesse, many times disposeth to the desertion of the Publique Defence.  Both these they say cannot stand together in the same person.

And to consider the contrariety of mens Opinions, and Manners in generall, It is they say, impossible to entertain a constant Civill Amity with all those, with whom the Businesse of the world constrains us to converse:  Which Businesse consisteth almost in nothing else but a perpetuall contention for Honor, Riches, and Authority.

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Leviathan from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.