Leviathan eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 636 pages of information about Leviathan.
are two opinions; one of the saying of the man; the other of his vertue.  To Have Faith In, or Trust To, or Beleeve A Man, signifie the same thing; namely, an opinion of the veracity of the man:  But to Beleeve What Is Said, signifieth onely an opinion of the truth of the saying.  But wee are to observe that this Phrase, I Beleeve In; as also the Latine, Credo In; and the Greek, Pisteno Eis, are never used but in the writings of Divines.  In stead of them, in other writings are put, I Beleeve Him; I Have Faith In Him; I Rely On Him:  and in Latin, Credo Illi; Fido Illi:  and in Greek, Pisteno Anto:  and that this singularity of the Ecclesiastical use of the word hath raised many disputes about the right object of the Christian Faith.

But by Beleeving In, as it is in the Creed, is meant, not trust in the Person; but Confession and acknowledgement of the Doctrine.  For not onely Christians, but all manner of men do so believe in God, as to hold all for truth they heare him say, whether they understand it, or not; which is all the Faith and trust can possibly be had in any person whatsoever:  But they do not all believe the Doctrine of the Creed.

From whence we may inferre, that when wee believe any saying whatsoever it be, to be true, from arguments taken, not from the thing it selfe, or from the principles of naturall Reason, but from the Authority, and good opinion wee have, of him that hath sayd it; then is the speaker, or person we believe in, or trust in, and whose word we take, the object of our Faith; and the Honour done in Believing, is done to him onely.  And consequently, when wee Believe that the Scriptures are the word of God, having no immediate revelation from God himselfe, our Beleefe, Faith, and Trust is in the Church; whose word we take, and acquiesce therein.  And they that believe that which a Prophet relates unto them in the name of God, take the word of the Prophet, do honour to him, and in him trust, and believe, touching the truth of what he relateth, whether he be a true, or a false Prophet.  And so it is also with all other History.  For if I should not believe all that is written By Historians, of the glorious acts of Alexander, or Caesar; I do not think the Ghost of Alexander, or Caesar, had any just cause to be offended; or any body else, but the Historian.  If Livy say the Gods made once a Cow speak, and we believe it not; wee distrust not God therein, but Livy.  So that it is evident, that whatsoever we believe, upon no other reason, than what is drawn from authority of men onely, and their writings; whether they be sent from God or not, is Faith in men onely.

CHAPTER VIII

Of the vertues commonly called intellectual;
and their contrary defects

Intellectuall Vertue Defined Vertue generally, in all sorts of subjects, is somewhat that is valued for eminence; and consisteth in comparison.  For if all things were equally in all men, nothing would be prized.  And by Vertues Intellectuall, are always understood such abilityes of the mind, as men praise, value, and desire should be in themselves; and go commonly under the name of a Good Witte; though the same word Witte, be used also, to distinguish one certain ability from the rest.

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Leviathan from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.