Leviathan eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 636 pages of information about Leviathan.

To conclude, The Light of humane minds is Perspicuous Words, but by exact definitions first snuffed, and purged from ambiguity; Reason is the Pace; Encrease of Science, the Way; and the Benefit of man-kind, the End.  And on the contrary, Metaphors, and senslesse and ambiguous words, are like Ignes Fatui; and reasoning upon them, is wandering amongst innumerable absurdities; and their end, contention, and sedition, or contempt.

Prudence & Sapience, With Their Difference As, much Experience, is Prudence; so, is much Science, Sapience.  For though wee usually have one name of Wisedome for them both; yet the Latines did always distinguish between Prudentia and Sapientia, ascribing the former to Experience, the later to Science.  But to make their difference appeare more cleerly, let us suppose one man endued with an excellent naturall use, and dexterity in handling his armes; and another to have added to that dexterity, an acquired Science, of where he can offend, or be offended by his adversarie, in every possible posture, or guard:  The ability of the former, would be to the ability of the later, as Prudence to Sapience; both usefull; but the later infallible.  But they that trusting onely to the authority of books, follow the blind blindly, are like him that trusting to the false rules of the master of fence, ventures praesumptuously upon an adversary, that either kills, or disgraces him.

Signes Of Science The signes of Science, are some, certain and infallible; some, uncertain.  Certain, when he that pretendeth the Science of any thing, can teach the same; that is to say, demonstrate the truth thereof perspicuously to another:  Uncertain, when onely some particular events answer to his pretence, and upon many occasions prove so as he sayes they must.  Signes of prudence are all uncertain; because to observe by experience, and remember all circumstances that may alter the successe, is impossible.  But in any businesse, whereof a man has not infallible Science to proceed by; to forsake his own natural judgement, and be guided by generall sentences read in Authors, and subject to many exceptions, is a signe of folly, and generally scorned by the name of Pedantry.  And even of those men themselves, that in Councells of the Common-wealth, love to shew their reading of Politiques and History, very few do it in their domestique affaires, where their particular interest is concerned; having Prudence enough for their private affaires:  but in publique they study more the reputation of their owne wit, than the successe of anothers businesse.

CHAPTER VI

Of the interiour beginnings of voluntary motions; commonly called the passionsAnd the speeches by which they are expressed.

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Leviathan from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.