She eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 371 pages of information about She.

“Yes, sir, and so I have,” he answered, “leastways I’ve seen a corpse, which is worse.  I’ve been in to call Mr. Vincey, as usual, and there he lies stark and dead!”

II

THE YEARS ROLL BY

As might be expected, poor Vincey’s sudden death created a great stir in the College; but, as he was known to be very ill, and a satisfactory doctor’s certificate was forthcoming, there was no inquest.  They were not so particular about inquests in those days as they are now; indeed, they were generally disliked, because of the scandal.  Under all these circumstances, being asked no questions, I did not feel called upon to volunteer any information about our interview on the night of Vincey’s decease, beyond saying that he had come into my rooms to see me, as he often did.  On the day of the funeral a lawyer came down from London and followed my poor friend’s remains to the grave, and then went back with his papers and effects, except, of course, the iron chest which had been left in my keeping.  For a week after this I heard no more of the matter, and, indeed, my attention was amply occupied in other ways, for I was up for my Fellowship, a fact that had prevented me from attending the funeral or seeing the lawyer.  At last, however, the examination was over, and I came back to my rooms and sank into an easy chair with a happy consciousness that I had got through it very fairly.

Soon, however, my thoughts, relieved of the pressure that had crushed them into a single groove during the last few days, turned to the events of the night of poor Vincey’s death, and again I asked myself what it all meant, and wondered if I should hear anything more of the matter, and if I did not, what it would be my duty to do with the curious iron chest.  I sat there and thought and thought till I began to grow quite disturbed over the whole occurrence:  the mysterious midnight visit, the prophecy of death so shortly to be fulfilled, the solemn oath that I had taken, and which Vincey had called on me to answer to in another world than this.  Had the man committed suicide?  It looked like it.  And what was the quest of which he spoke?  The circumstances were uncanny, so much so that, though I am by no means nervous, or apt to be alarmed at anything that may seem to cross the bounds of the natural, I grew afraid, and began to wish I had nothing to do with them.  How much more do I wish it now, over twenty years afterwards!

As I sat and thought, there came a knock at the door, and a letter, in a big blue envelope, was brought in to me.  I saw at a glance that it was a lawyer’s letter, and an instinct told me that it was connected with my trust.  The letter, which I still have, runs thus:—­

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She from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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