The Surprising Adventures of Baron Munchausen eBook

Rudolf Erich Raspe
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 156 pages of information about The Surprising Adventures of Baron Munchausen.
winter hunger.  He soon overtook me.  There was no possibility of escape.  Mechanically I laid myself down flat in the sledge, and let my horse run for our safety.  What I wished, but hardly hoped or expected, happened immediately after.  The wolf did not mind me in the least, but took a leap over me, and falling furiously on the horse, began instantly to tear and devour the hind-part of the poor animal, which ran the faster for his pain and terror.  Thus unnoticed and safe myself, I lifted my head slyly up, and with horror I beheld that the wolf had ate his way into the horse’s body; it was not long before he had fairly forced himself into it, when I took my advantage, and fell upon him with the butt-end of my whip.  This unexpected attack in his rear frightened him so much, that he leaped forward with all his might:  the horse’s carcase dropped on the ground, but in his place the wolf was in the harness, and I on my part whipping him continually:  we both arrived in full career safe at St. Petersburg, contrary to our respective expectations, and very much to the astonishment of the spectators.

I shall not tire you, gentlemen, with the politics, arts, sciences, and history of this magnificent metropolis of Russia, nor trouble you with the various intrigues and pleasant adventures I had in the politer circles of that country, where the lady of the house always receives the visitor with a dram and a salute.  I shall confine myself rather to the greater and nobler objects of your attention, horses and dogs, my favourites in the brute creation; also to foxes, wolves, and bears, with which, and game in general, Russia abounds more than any other part of the world; and to such sports, manly exercises, and feats of gallantry and activity, as show the gentleman better than musty Greek or Latin, or all the perfume, finery, and capers of French wits or petit-maitres.

CHAPTER III

An encounter between the Baron’s nose and a door-post, with its wonderful effects—­Fifty brace of ducks and other fowl destroyed by one shot—­Flogs a fox out of his skin—­Leads an old sow home in a new way, and vanquishes a wild boar.

It was some time before I could obtain a commission in the army, and for several months I was perfectly at liberty to sport away my time and money in the most gentleman-like manner.  You may easily imagine that I spent much of both out of town with such gallant fellows as knew how to make the most of an open forest country.  The very recollection of those amusements gives me fresh spirits, and creates a warm wish for a repetition of them.  One morning I saw, through the windows of my bed-room, that a large pond not far off was covered with wild ducks.  In an instant I took my gun from the corner, ran down-stairs and out of the house in such a hurry, that I imprudently struck my face against the door-post.  Fire flew out of my eyes, but it did not prevent my intention;

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The Surprising Adventures of Baron Munchausen from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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