Baddeck, and That Sort of Thing eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 107 pages of information about Baddeck, and That Sort of Thing.
us to partake freely of that simple drink.  And he refused to take any pay for it, in a sort of surprise that such a simple act of hospitality should have any commercial value.  But travelers themselves destroy one of their chief pleasures.  No doubt we planted the notion in the McGregor mind that the small kindnesses of life may be made profitable, by offering to pay for the milk; and probably the next travelers in that Eden will succeed in leaving some small change there, if they use a little tact.

It was late in the season for trout.  Perhaps the McGregor was aware of that when he freely gave us the run of the stream in his meadows, and pointed out the pools where we should be sure of good luck.  It was a charming August day, just the day that trout enjoy lying in cool, deep places, and moving their fins in quiet content, indifferent to the skimming fly or to the proffered sport of rod and reel.  The Middle River gracefully winds through this Vale of Tempe, over a sandy bottom, sometimes sparkling in shallows, and then gently reposing in the broad bends of the grassy banks.  It was in one of these bends, where the stream swirled around in seductive eddies, that we tried our skill.  We heroically waded the stream and threw our flies from the highest bank; but neither in the black water nor in the sandy shallows could any trout be coaxed to spring to the deceitful leaders.  We enjoyed the distinction of being the only persons who had ever failed to strike trout in that pool, and this was something.  The meadows were sweet with the newly cut grass, the wind softly blew down the river, large white clouds sailed high overhead and cast shadows on the changing water; but to all these gentle influences the fish were insensible, and sulked in their cool retreats.  At length in a small brook flowing into the Middle River we found the trout more sociable; and it is lucky that we did so, for I should with reluctance stain these pages with a fiction; and yet the public would have just reason to resent a fish-story without any fish in it.  Under a bank, in a pool crossed by a log and shaded by a tree, we found a drove of the speckled beauties at home, dozens of them a foot long, each moving lazily a little, their black backs relieved by their colored fins.  They must have seen us, but at first they showed no desire for a closer acquaintance.  To the red ibis and the white miller and the brown hackle and the gray fly they were alike indifferent.  Perhaps the love for made flies is an artificial taste and has to be cultivated.  These at any rate were uncivilized -trout, and it was only when we took the advice of the young McGregor and baited our hooks with the angleworm, that the fish joined in our day’s sport.  They could not resist the lively wiggle of the worm before their very noses, and we lifted them out one after an other, gently, and very much as if we were hooking them out of a barrel, until we had a handsome string.  It may have been fun for them but it was not much sport for us.  All the small ones the young McGregor contemptuously threw back into the water.  The sportsman will perhaps learn from this incident that there are plenty of trout in Cape Breton in August, but that the fishing is not exhilarating.

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Baddeck, and That Sort of Thing from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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