A Changed Man; and other tales eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 338 pages of information about A Changed Man; and other tales.

I gently pushed him through the doorway, and went back into the transept, down the nave, and onward to the west door.  There I saw my father, to whom I spoke.  He answered severely that, having first obtained comfortable quarters in a pension on the Grand Canal, he had gone back to the hotel on the Riva degli Schiavoni to find me; but that I was not there.  He was now waiting for Caroline, to accompany her back to the pension, at which she had requested to be left to herself as much as possible till she could regain some composure.

I told him that it was useless to dwell on what was past, that I no doubt had erred, that the remedy lay in the future and their marriage.  In this he quite agreed with me, and on my informing him that M. de la Feste was at that moment with Caroline in the sacristy, he assented to my proposal that we should leave them to themselves, and return together to await them at the pension, where he had also engaged a room for me.  This we did, and going up to the chamber he had chosen for me, which overlooked the Canal, I leant from the window to watch for the gondola that should contain Charles and my sister.

They were not long in coming.  I recognized them by the colour of her sunshade as soon as they turned the bend on my right hand.  They were side by side of necessity, but there was no conversation between them, and I thought that she looked flushed and he pale.  When they were rowed in to the steps of our house he handed her up.  I fancied she might have refused his assistance, but she did not.  Soon I heard her pass my door, and wishing to know the result of their interview I went downstairs, seeing that the gondola had not put off with him.  He was turning from the door, but not towards the water, intending apparently to walk home by way of the calle which led into the Via 22 Marzo.

‘Has she forgiven you?’ said I.

‘I have not asked her,’ he said.

‘But you are bound to do so,’ I told him.

He paused, and then said, ’Alicia, let us understand each other.  Do you mean to tell me, once for all, that if your sister is willing to become my wife you absolutely make way for her, and will not entertain any thought of what I suggested to you any more?’

‘I do tell you so,’ said I with dry lips.  ’You belong to her—­how can I do otherwise?’

‘Yes; it is so; it is purely a question of honour,’ he returned.  ’Very well then, honour shall be my word, and not my love.  I will put the question to her frankly; if she says yes, the marriage shall be.  But not here.  It shall be at your own house in England.’

‘When?’ said I.

‘I will accompany her there,’ he replied, ’and it shall be within a week of her return.  I have nothing to gain by delay.  But I will not answer for the consequences.’

‘What do you mean?’ said I. He made no reply, went away, and I came back to my room.

CHAPTER IX.—­SHE WITNESSES THE END

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A Changed Man; and other tales from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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