A Changed Man; and other tales eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 338 pages of information about A Changed Man; and other tales.

‘You said I could go to sleep for a hollerday, and I did.’

’Don’t you speak to your betters like that, young man, or you’ll come to the gallows-tree!  You didn’t sleep all the time, or you wouldn’t have been peeping out of that there hole!  Now you can go home, and be up here again by breakfast-time.  I be an old man, and there’s old men that deserve well of the world; but no I—­must rest how I can!’

The elder shepherd then lay down inside the hut, and the boy went down the hill to the hamlet where he dwelt.

SECOND NIGHT

When the next night drew on the actions of the boy were almost enough to show that he was thinking of the meeting he had witnessed, and of the promise wrung from the lady that she would come there again.  As far as the sheep-tending arrangements were concerned, to-night was but a repetition of the foregoing one.  Between ten and eleven o’clock the old shepherd withdrew as usual for what sleep at home he might chance to get without interruption, making up the other necessary hours of rest at some time during the day; the boy was left alone.

The frost was the same as on the night before, except perhaps that it was a little more severe.  The moon shone as usual, except that it was three-quarters of an hour later in its course; and the boy’s condition was much the same, except that he felt no sleepiness whatever.  He felt, too, rather afraid; but upon the whole he preferred witnessing an assignation of strangers to running the risk of being discovered absent by the old shepherd.

It was before the distant clock of Shakeforest Towers had struck eleven that he observed the opening of the second act of this midnight drama.  It consisted in the appearance of neither lover nor Duchess, but of the third figure—­the stout man, booted and spurred—­who came up from the easterly direction in which he had retreated the night before.  He walked once round the trilithon, and next advanced towards the clump concealing the hut, the moonlight shining full upon his face and revealing him to be the Duke.  Fear seized upon the shepherd-boy:  the Duke was Jove himself to the rural population, whom to offend was starvation, homelessness, and death, and whom to look at was to be mentally scathed and dumbfoundered.  He closed the stove, so that not a spark of light appeared, and hastily buried himself in the straw that lay in a corner.

The Duke came close to the clump of furze and stood by the spot where his wife and the Captain had held their dialogue; he examined the furze as if searching for a hiding-place, and in doing so discovered the hut.  The latter he walked round and then looked inside; finding it to all seeming empty, he entered, closing the door behind him and taking his place at the little circular window against which the boy’s face had been pressed just before.

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A Changed Man; and other tales from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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