The Lady of the Lake eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 227 pages of information about The Lady of the Lake.

At dawn the towers of Stirling rang
With soldier-step and weapon-clang,
While drums with rolling note foretell
Relief to weary sentinel. 
Through narrow loop and casement barred,
The sunbeams sought the Court of Guard,
And, struggling with the smoky air,
Deadened the torches’ yellow glare. 
In comfortless alliance shone
The lights through arch of blackened stone,
And showed wild shapes in garb of war,
Faces deformed with beard and scar,
All haggard from the midnight watch,
And fevered with the stern debauch;
For the oak table’s massive board,
Flooded with wine, with fragments stored,
And beakers drained, and cups o’erthrown,
Showed in what sport the night had flown. 
Some, weary, snored on floor and bench;
Some labored still their thirst to quench;
Some, chilled with watching, spread their hands
O’er the huge chimney’s dying brands,
While round them, or beside them flung,
At every step their harness rung.

III.

These drew not for their fields the sword,
Like tenants of a feudal lord,
Nor owned the patriarchal claim
Of Chieftain in their leader’s name;
Adventurers they, from far who roved,
To live by battle which they loved. 
There the Italian’s clouded face,
The swarthy Spaniard’s there you trace;
The mountain-loving Switzer there
More freely breathed in mountain-air;
The Fleming there despised the soil
That paid so ill the labourer’s toil;
Their rolls showed French and German name;
And merry England’s exiles came,
To share, with ill-concealed disdain,
Of Scotland’s pay the scanty gain. 
All brave in arms, well trained to wield
The heavy halberd, brand, and shield;
In camps licentious, wild, and bold;
In pillage fierce and uncontrolled;
And now, by holytide and feast,
From rules of discipline released.

IV.

’They held debate of bloody fray,
Fought ’twixt Loch Katrine and Achray. 
Fierce was their speech, and mid their words
’Their hands oft grappled to their swords;
Nor sunk their tone to spare the ear
Of wounded comrades groaning near,
Whose mangled limbs and bodies gored
Bore token of the mountain sword,
Though, neighbouring to the Court of Guard,
Their prayers and feverish wails were heard,—­
Sad burden to the ruffian joke,
And savage oath by fury spoke!—­
At length up started John of Brent,
A yeoman from the banks of Trent;
A stranger to respect or fear,
In peace a chaser of the deer,
In host a hardy mutineer,
But still the boldest of the crew
When deed of danger was to do. 
He grieved that day their games cut short,
And marred the dicer’s brawling sport,
And shouted loud, ’Renew the bowl! 
And, while a merry catch I troll,
Let each the buxom chorus bear,
Like brethren of the brand and spear.’

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
The Lady of the Lake from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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