The Lady of the Lake eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 227 pages of information about The Lady of the Lake.
And sought, in mist and meteor fire,
To meet and know his Phantom Sire! 
In vain, to soothe his wayward fate,
The cloister oped her pitying gate;
In vain the learning of the age
Unclasped the sable-lettered page;
Even in its treasures he could find
Food for the fever of his mind. 
Eager he read whatever tells
Of magic, cabala, and spells,
And every dark pursuit allied
To curious and presumptuous pride;
Till with fired brain and nerves o’erstrung,
And heart with mystic horrors wrung,
Desperate he sought Benharrow’s den,
And hid him from the haunts of men.

VII.

The desert gave him visions wild,
Such as might suit the spectre’s child. 
Where with black cliffs the torrents toil,
He watched the wheeling eddies boil,
Jill from their foam his dazzled eyes
Beheld the River Demon rise: 
The mountain mist took form and limb
Of noontide hag or goblin grim;
The midnight wind came wild and dread,
Swelled with the voices of the dead;
Far on the future battle-heath
His eye beheld the ranks of death: 
Thus the lone Seer, from mankind hurled,
Shaped forth a disembodied world. 
One lingering sympathy of mind
Still bound him to the mortal kind;
The only parent he could claim
Of ancient Alpine’s lineage came. 
Late had he heard, in prophet’s dream,
The fatal Ben-Shie’s boding scream;
Sounds, too, had come in midnight blast
Of charging steeds, careering fast
Along Benharrow’s shingly side,
Where mortal horseman ne’er might ride;
The thunderbolt had split the pine,—­
All augured ill to Alpine’s line. 
He girt his loins, and came to show
The signals of impending woe,
And now stood prompt to bless or ban,
As bade the Chieftain of his clan.

VIII.

’T was all prepared;—­and from the rock
A goat, the patriarch of the flock,
Before the kindling pile was laid,
And pierced by Roderick’s ready blade. 
Patient the sickening victim eyed
The life-blood ebb in crimson tide
Down his clogged beard and shaggy limb,
Till darkness glazed his eyeballs dim. 
The grisly priest, with murmuring prayer,
A slender crosslet framed with care,
A cubit’s length in measure due;
The shaft and limbs were rods of yew,
Whose parents in Inch-Cailliach wave
Their shadows o’er Clan-Alpine’s grave,
And, answering Lomond’s breezes deep,
Soothe many a chieftain’s endless sleep. 
The Cross thus formed he held on high,
With wasted hand and haggard eye,
And strange and mingled feelings woke,
While his anathema he spoke:—­

IX.

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
The Lady of the Lake from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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