Undine eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 99 pages of information about Undine.

“Some say it is the end of the strong wicked man, just overtaken by Death and Sin, whom he has served on earth.  It is said that the tuft on the lance indicates his murderous character, being of such unusual size.  You know the use of that appendage was to prevent blood running down from the spearhead to the hands.  They also think that the object under the horse’s off hind foot is a snare, into which the old oppressor is to fall instantly.  The expression of the faces may be taken either way:  both good men and bad may have hard, regular features; and both good men and bad would set their teeth grimly on seeing Death, with the sands of their life nearly run out.  Some say they think the expression of Death gentle, or only admonitory (as the author of “Sintram"); and I have to thank the authoress of the “Heir of Redclyffe” for showing me a fine impression of the plate, where Death certainly had a not ungentle countenance—­snakes and all.  I think the shouldered lance, and quiet, firm seat on horseback, with gentle bearing on the curb-bit, indicate grave resolution in the rider, and that a robber knight would have his lance in rest; then there is the leafy crown on the horse’s head; and the horse and dog move on so quietly, that I am inclined to hope the best for the Ritter.”

Musing on the mysterious engraving, Fouque saw in it the life-long companions of man, Death and Sin, whom he must defy in order to reach salvation; and out of that contemplation rose his wonderful romance, not exactly an allegory, where every circumstance can be fitted with an appropriate meaning, but with the sense of the struggle of life, with external temptation and hereditary inclination pervading all, while Grace and Prayer aid the effort.  Folko and Gabrielle are revived from the Magic Ring, that Folko may by example and influence enhance all higher resolutions; while Gabrielle, in all unconscious innocence, awakes the passions, and thus makes the conquest the harder.

It is within the bounds of possibility that the similarities of folk-lore may have brought to Fouque’s knowledge the outline of the story which Scott tells us was the germ of “Guy Mannering”; where a boy, whose horoscope had been drawn by an astrologer, as likely to encounter peculiar trials at certain intervals, actually had, in his twenty-first year, a sort of visible encounter with the Tempter, and came off conqueror by his strong faith in the Bible.  Sir Walter, between reverence and realism, only took the earlier part of the story, but Fouque gives us the positive struggle, and carries us along with the final victory and subsequent peace.  His tale has had a remarkable power over the readers.  We cannot but mention two remarkable instances at either end of the scale.  Cardinal Newman, in his younger days, was so much overcome by it that he hurried out into the garden to read it alone, and returned with traces of emotion in his face.  And when Charles Lowder read it to his East End boys, their whole minds seemed engrossed by it, and they even called certain spots after the places mentioned.  Imagine the Rocks of the Moon in Ratcliff Highway!

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Undine from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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