Joan of Naples eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 140 pages of information about Joan of Naples.

When the vice-chancellor had finished reading, the king sat up, and glancing round upon his fair and numerous family, thus spoke: 

“My children, you have heard my last wishes.  I have bidden you all to my deathbed, that you may see how the glory of the world passes away.  Those whom men name the great ones of the earth have more duties to perform, and after death more accounts to render:  it is in this that their greatness lies.  I have reigned thirty-three years, and God before whom I am about to appear, God to whom my sighs have often arisen during my long and painful life, God alone knows the thoughts that rend my heart in the hour of death.  Soon shall I be lying in the tomb, and all that remains of me in this world will live in the memory of those who pray for me.  But before I leave you for ever, you, oh, you who are twice my daughters, whom I have loved with a double love, and you my nephews who have had from me all the care and affection of a father, promise me to be ever united in heart and in wish, as indeed you are in my love.  I have lived longer than your fathers, I the eldest of all, and thus no doubt God has wished to tighten the bonds of your affection, to accustom you to live in one family and to pay honour to one head.  I have loved you all alike, as a father should, without exception or preference.  I have disposed of my throne according to the law of nature and the inspiration of my conscience:  Here are the heirs of the crown of Naples; you, Joan, and you, Andre, will never forget the love and respect that are due between husband and wife, and mutually sworn by you at the foot of the altar; and you, my nephews all; my barons, my officers, render homage to your lawful sovereigns; Andre of Hungary, Louis of Tarentum, Charles of Durazzo, remember that you are brothers; woe to him who shall imitate the perfidy of Cain!  May his blood fall upon his own head, and may he be accursed by Heaven as he is by the mouth of a dying man; and may the blessing of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit descend upon that man whose heart is good, when the Lord of mercy shall call to my soul Himself!”

The king remained motionless, his arms raised, his eyes fixed on heaven, his cheeks extraordinarily bright, while the princes, barons, and officers of the court proffered to Joan and her husband the oath of fidelity and allegiance.  When it was the turn of the Princes of Duras to advance, Charles disdainfully stalked past Andre, and bending his knee before the princess, said in a loud voice, as he kissed her hand—­

“To you, my queen, I pay my homage.”

All looks were turned fearfully towards the dying man, but the good king no longer heard.  Seeing him fall back rigid and motionless, Dona Sancha burst into sobs, and cried in a voice choked with tears—­

“The king is dead; let us pray for his soul.”

At the very same moment all the princes hurried from the room, and every passion hitherto suppressed in the presence of the king now found its vent like a mighty torrent breaking through its banks.

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
Joan of Naples from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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