Forgot your password?  

Resources for students & teachers

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 75 pages of information about La Constantin.

Meantime the lady, quite subdued by his noisy entrance and ruffianly conduct, and seeing that an assumption of dignity would only draw down on her some fresh impertinence, appeared to resign herself to her position.  All this time Quennebert never took his eyes from the chevalier, who sat with his face towards the partition.  His elegantly cut costume accentuated his personal advantages.  His jet black hair brought into relief the whiteness of his forehead; his large dark eyes with their veined lids and silky lashes had a penetrating and peculiar expression—­a mixture of audacity and weakness; his thin and somewhat pale lips were apt to curl in an ironical smile; his hands were of perfect beauty, his feet of dainty smallness, and he showed with an affectation of complaisance a well-turned leg above his ample boots, the turned down tops of which, garnished with lace, fell in irregular folds aver his ankles in the latest fashion.  He did not appear to be more than eighteen years of age, and nature had denied his charming face the distinctive sign of his sex for not the slightest down was visible on his chin, though a little delicate pencilling darkened his upper lip:  His slightly effeminate style of beauty, the graceful curves of his figure, his expression, sometimes coaxing, sometimes saucy, reminding one of a page, gave him the appearance of a charming young scapegrace destined to inspire sudden passions and wayward fancies.  While his pretended uncle was making himself at home most unceremoniously, Quennebert remarked that the chevalier at once began to lay siege to his fair hostess, bestowing tender and love-laden glances on her behind that uncle’s back.  This redoubled his curiosity.

“My dear girl,” said the commander, “since I saw you last I have come into a fortune of one hundred thousand livres, neither more nor less.  One of my dear aunts took it into her head to depart this life, and her temper being crotchety and spiteful she made me her sole heir, in order to enrage those of her relatives who had nursed her in her illness.  One hundred thousand livres!  It’s a round sum—­enough to cut a great figure with for two years.  If you like, we shall squander it together, capital and interest.  Why do you not speak?  Has anyone else robbed me by any chance of your heart?  If that were so, I should be in despair, upon my word-for the sake of the fortunate individual who had won your favour; for I will brook no rivals, I give you fair warning.”

“Monsieur le commandeur,” answered Angelique, “you forget, in speaking to me in that manner, I have never given you any right to control my actions.”

“Have we severed our connection?”

At this singular question Angelique started, but de Jars continued—­

“When last we parted we were on the best of terms, were we not?  I know that some months have elapsed since then, but I have explained to you the reason of my absence.  Before filling up the blank left by the departed we must give ourselves space to mourn.  Well, was I right in my guess?  Have you given me a successor?”

Follow Us on Facebook