La Constantin eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 75 pages of information about La Constantin.
the desires she excited, she was really incapable of resisting an attack conducted with skill and ardour, and if the Duc de Vitry had not been so madly in love, which is the same as saying that he was hopelessly blind, silly, and dense to everything around him, he might have found a score of opportunities to overcome her resistance.  We have already seen that she was so straitened in money matters that she had been driven to try to sell her jewels that very, morning.

Jeannin was the first to ’break silence.

“You are astonished at my visit, I know, my charming Angelique.  But you must excuse my thus appearing so unexpectedly before you.  The truth is, I found it impossible to leave Paris without seeing you once more.”

“Thank you for your kind remembrance,” said she, “but I did not at all expect it.”

“Come, come, you are offended with me.”

She gave him a glance of mingled disdain and resentment; but he went on, in a timid, wistful tone—­

“I know that my conduct must have seemed strange to you, and I acknowledge that nothing can justify a man for suddenly leaving the woman he loves—­I do not dare to say the woman who loves him—­without a word of explanation.  But, dear Angelique, I was jealous.”

“Jealous!” she repeated incredulously.

“I tried my best to overcome the feeling, and I hid my suspicions from you.  Twenty times I came to see you bursting with anger and determined to overwhelm you with reproaches, but at the sight of your beauty I forgot everything but that I loved you.  My suspicions dissolved before a smile; one word from your lips charmed me into happiness.  But when I was again alone my terrors revived, I saw my rivals at your feet, and rage possessed me once more.  Ah! you never knew how devotedly I loved you.”

She let him speak without interruption; perhaps the same thought was in her mind as in Quennebert’s, who, himself a past master in the art of lying; was thinking—­

“The man does not believe a word of what he is saying.”

But the treasurer went on—­

“I can see that even now you doubt my sincerity.”

“Does my lord desire that his handmaiden should be blunt?  Well, I know that there is no truth in what you say.”

“Oh!  I can see that you imagine that among the distractions of the world I have kept no memory of you, and have found consolation in the love of less obdurate fair ones.  I have not broken in on your retirement; I have not shadowed your steps; I have not kept watch on your actions; I have not surrounded you with spies who would perhaps have brought me the assurance, ’If she quitted the world which outraged her, she was not driven forth by an impulse of wounded pride or noble indignation; she did not even seek to punish those who misunderstood her by her absence; she buried herself where she was unknown, that she might indulge in stolen loves.’  Such were the thoughts that came to me, and yet I respected your hiding-place; and to-day I am ready to believe you true, if you will merely say, ‘I love no one else!’”

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Project Gutenberg
La Constantin from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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