Eric Brighteyes eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 401 pages of information about Eric Brighteyes.

But its fame lived on in the minds of men.  From generation to generation skalds wandered through the winter snows, much as Homer may have wandered in his day across the Grecian vales and mountains, to find a welcome at every stead, because of the old-time story they had to tell.  Here, night after night, they would sit in the ingle and while away the weariness of the dayless dark with histories of the times when men carried their lives in their hands, and thought them well lost if there might be a song in the ears of folk to come.  To alter the tale was one of the greatest of crimes:  the skald must repeat it as it came to him; but by degrees undoubtedly the sagas did suffer alteration.  The facts remained the same indeed, but around them gathered a mist of miraculous occurrences and legends.  To take a single instance:  the account of the burning of Bergthorsknoll in the Njal Saga is not only a piece of descriptive writing that for vivid, simple force and insight is scarcely to be matched out of Homer and the Bible, it is also obviously true.  We feel as we read, that no man could have invented that story, though some great skald threw it into shape.  That the tale is true, the writer of “Eric” can testify, for, saga in hand, he has followed every act of the drama on its very site.  There he who digs beneath the surface of the lonely mound that looks across plain and sea to Westman Isles may still find traces of the burning, and see what appears to be the black sand with which the hands of Bergthora and her women strewed the earthen floor some nine hundred years ago, and even the greasy and clotted remains of the whey that they threw upon the flame to quench it.  He may discover the places where Fosi drew up his men, where Skarphedinn died, singing while his legs were burnt from off him, where Kari leapt from the flaming ruin, and the dell in which he laid down to rest—­at every step, in short, the truth of the narrative becomes more obvious.  And yet the tale has been added to, for, unless we may believe that some human beings are gifted with second sight, we cannot accept as true the prophetic vision that came to Runolf, Thorstein’s son; or that of Njal who, on the evening of the onslaught, like Theoclymenus in the Odyssey, saw the whole board and the meats upon it “one gore of blood.”

Thus, in the Norse romance now offered to the reader, the tale of Eric and his deeds would be true; but the dream of Asmund, the witchcraft of Swanhild, the incident of the speaking head, and the visions of Eric and Skallagrim, would owe their origin to the imagination of successive generations of skalds; and, finally, in the fifteenth or sixteenth century, the story would have been written down with all its supernatural additions.

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Eric Brighteyes from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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