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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 182 pages of information about Beasts and Super-Beasts.

“Perhaps it will go elsewhere now there are no more fowls left,” suggested Amanda.

“One would think you wanted to shield the beast,” said Egbert.

“There’s been so little water in the stream lately,” objected Amanda; “it seems hardly sporting to hunt an animal when it has so little chance of taking refuge anywhere.”

“Good gracious!” fumed Egbert, “I’m not thinking about sport.  I want to have the animal killed as soon as possible.”

Even Amanda’s opposition weakened when, during church time on the following Sunday, the otter made its way into the house, raided half a salmon from the larder and worried it into scaly fragments on the Persian rug in Egbert’s studio.

“We shall have it hiding under our beds and biting pieces out of our feet before long,” said Egbert, and from what Amanda knew of this particular otter she felt that the possibility was not a remote one.

On the evening preceding the day fixed for the hunt Amanda spent a solitary hour walking by the banks of the stream, making what she imagined to be hound noises.  It was charitably supposed by those who overheard her performance, that she was practising for farmyard imitations at the forth-coming village entertainment.

It was her friend and neighbour, Aurora Burret, who brought her news of the day’s sport.

“Pity you weren’t out; we had quite a good day.  We found at once, in the pool just below your garden.”

“Did you—­kill?” asked Amanda.

“Rather.  A fine she-otter.  Your husband got rather badly bitten in trying to ‘tail it.’  Poor beast, I felt quite sorry for it, it had such a human look in its eyes when it was killed.  You’ll call me silly, but do you know who the look reminded me of?  My dear woman, what is the matter?”

When Amanda had recovered to a certain extent from her attack of nervous prostration Egbert took her to the Nile Valley to recuperate.  Change of scene speedily brought about the desired recovery of health and mental balance.  The escapades of an adventurous otter in search of a variation of diet were viewed in their proper light.  Amanda’s normally placid temperament reasserted itself.  Even a hurricane of shouted curses, coming from her husband’s dressing-room, in her husband’s voice, but hardly in his usual vocabulary, failed to disturb her serenity as she made a leisurely toilet one evening in a Cairo hotel.

“What is the matter?  What has happened?” she asked in amused curiosity.

“The little beast has thrown all my clean shirts into the bath!  Wait till I catch you, you little—­”

“What little beast?” asked Amanda, suppressing a desire to laugh; Egbert’s language was so hopelessly inadequate to express his outraged feelings.

“A little beast of a naked brown Nubian boy,” spluttered Egbert.

And now Amanda is seriously ill.

THE BOAR-PIG

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