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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 556 pages of information about The Vicomte De Bragelonne.

The king made no answer, and retired quite pensive, convinced, not of all Mazarin had told him, but of one thing which he took care not to mention to him; and that was, that it was necessary for him to study seriously both his own affairs and those of Europe, for he found them very difficult and very obscure.  Louis found the king of England seated in the same place where he had left him.  On perceiving him, the English prince arose; but at the first glance he saw discouragement written in dark letters upon his cousin’s brow.  Then, speaking first, as if to facilitate the painful avowal that Louis had to make to him, —

“Whatever it may be,” said he, “I shall never forget all the kindness, all the friendship you have exhibited towards me.”

“Alas!” replied Louis, in a melancholy tone, “only barren good-will, my brother.”

Charles II. became extremely pale; he passed his cold hand over his brow, and struggled for a few instants against a faintness that made him tremble.  “I understand,” said he at last; “no more hope!”

Louis seized the hand of Charles II.  “Wait, my brother,” said he; “precipitate nothing; everything may change; hasty resolutions ruin all causes; add another year of trial, I implore you, to the years you have already undergone.  You have, to induce you to act now rather than at another time, neither occasion nor opportunity.  Come with me, my brother; I will give you one of my residences, whichever you prefer, to inhabit.  I, with you, will keep my eyes upon events; we will prepare.  Come, then, my brother, have courage!”

Charles II. withdrew his hand from that of the king, and drawing back, to salute him with more ceremony, “With all my heart, thanks!” replied he, “sire; but I have prayed without success to the greatest king on earth; now I will go and ask a miracle of God.”  And he went out without being willing to hear any more, his head carried loftily, his hand trembling, with a painful contraction of his noble countenance, and that profound gloom which, finding no more hope in the world of men, appeared to go beyond it, and ask it in worlds unknown.  The officer of musketeers, on seeing him pass by thus pale, bowed almost to his knees as he saluted him.  He then took a flambeau, called two musketeers, and descended the deserted staircase with the unfortunate king, holding in his left hand his hat, the plume of which swept the steps.  Arrived at the door, the musketeer asked the king which way he was going, that he might direct the musketeers.

“Monsieur,” replied Charles II., in a subdued voice, “you who have known my father, say, did you ever pray for him?  If you have done so, do not forget me in your prayers.  Now, I am going alone, and beg of you not to accompany me, or have me accompanied any further.”

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