Queen Sheba's Ring eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 368 pages of information about Queen Sheba's Ring.

“This:  They gave me some gold and an escort with camels which were literally lowered down a secret path in the mountains so as to avoid the Fung, who ring them in and of whom they are terribly afraid.  With these people I crossed the desert to Assouan in safety, a journey of many weeks, where I left them encamped about sixteen days ago, bidding them await my return.  I arrived in England this morning, and as soon as I could ascertain that you still lived, and your address, from a book of reference called Who’s Who, which they gave me in the hotel, I came on here.”

“Why did you come to me?  What do you want me to do?” asked the Professor.

“I came to you, Higgs, because I know how deeply you are interested in anything antiquarian, and because I wished to give you the first opportunity, not only of winning wealth, but also of becoming famous as the discoverer of the most wonderful relics of antiquity that are left in the world.”

“With a very good chance of getting my throat cut thrown in,” grumbled Higgs.

“As to what I want you to do,” I went on, “I want you to find someone who understands explosives, and will undertake the business of blowing up the Fung idol.”

“Well, that’s easy enough, anyhow,” said the Professor, pointing to Captain Orme with the bowl of his pipe, and adding, “he is an engineer by education, a soldier and a very fair chemist; also he knows Arabic and was brought up in Egypt as a boy—­just the man for the job if he will go.”

I reflected a moment, then, obeying some sort of instinct, looked up and asked: 

“Will you, Captain Orme, if terms can be arranged?”

“Yesterday,” he replied, colouring a little, “I should have answered, ‘Certainly not.’  To-day I answer that I am prepared to consider the matter—­that is, if Higgs will go too, and you can enlighten me on certain points.  But I warn you that I am only an amateur in the three trades that the Professor has mentioned, though, it is true, one with some experience.”

“Would it be rude to inquire, Captain Orme, why twenty-four hours have made such a difference in your views and plans?”

“Not rude, only awkward,” he replied, colouring again, this time more deeply.  “Still, as it is best to be frank, I will tell you.  Yesterday I believed myself to be the inheritor of a very large fortune from an uncle whose fatal illness brought me back from South Africa before I meant to come, and as whose heir I have been brought up.  To-day I have learned for the first time that he married secretly, last year, a woman much below him in rank, and has left a child, who, of course, will take all his property, as he died intestate.  But that is not all.  Yesterday I believed myself to be engaged to be married; to-day I am undeceived upon that point also.  The lady,” he added with some bitterness, “who was willing to marry Anthony Orme’s heir is no longer willing to marry Oliver Orme, whose total possessions amount to under L10,000.  Well, small blame to her or to her relations, whichever it may be, especially as I understand that she has a better alliance in view.  Certainly her decision has simplified matters,” and he rose and walked to the other end of the room.

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Queen Sheba's Ring from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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