Droll Stories — Volume 3 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 187 pages of information about Droll Stories — Volume 3.

“Ah, my father!” said the lady, “if you love us, you will refresh yourself after your merry labour by washing yourself in a bath that I have had heated by Perrotte.”

Amador was then bathed in scented water.  When he came out he found a new robe of fine linen and lovely sandals ready for him, which made him appear the most glorious monk in the world.

Meanwhile the monks of Turpenay fearing for Amador, had ordered two of their number to spy about the castle.  These spies came round by the moat, just as Perrotte threw Amador’s greasy old gown, with other rubbish, into it.  Seeing which, they thought that it was all over with the poor madman.  They therefore returned, and announced that it was certain Amador had suffered martyrdom in the service of the abbey.  Hearing which the abbot ordered them to assemble in the chapel and pray to God, in order to assist this devoted servant in his torments.  The monk having supped, put his charter into his girdle, and wished to return to Turpenay.  Then he found at the foot of the steps madame’s mare, bridled and saddled, and held ready for him by a groom.  The lord had ordered his men-at-arms to accompany the good monk, so that no accident might befall him.  Seeing which, Amador pardoned the tricks of the night before, and bestowed his benediction upon every one before taking his departure from this converted place.  Madame followed him with her eyes, and proclaimed him a splendid rider.  Perrotte declared that for a monk he held himself more upright in the saddle than any of the men-at-arms.  Mademoiselle de Cande sighed.  The little one wished to have him for her confessor.

“He has sanctified the castle,” said they, when they were in the room again.

When Amador and his suite came to the gates of the abbey, a scene of terror ensued, since the guardian thought that the Sire de Cande had had his appetite for monks whetted by the blood of poor Amador, and wished to sack the abbey.  But Amador shouted with his fine bass voice, and was recognised and admitted into the courtyard; and when he dismounted from madame’s mare there was enough uproar to make the monks as a wild as April moons.  They gave vent to shouts of joy in the refectory, and all came to congratulate Amador, who waved the charter over his head.  The men-at-arms were regaled with the best wine in the cellars, which was a present made to the monks of Turpenay by those of Marmoustier, to whom belonged the lands of Vouvray.  The good abbot having had the document of the Sieur de Cande read, went about saying—­

“On these divine occasions there always appears the finger of God, to whom we should render thanks.”

As the good abbot kept on at the finger of God, when thanking Amador, the monk, annoyed to see the instrument of their delivery thus diminished, said to him—­

“Well, say that it is the arm, my father, and drop the subject.”

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Droll Stories — Volume 3 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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