A Dark Night's Work eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 200 pages of information about A Dark Night's Work.

It was not a satisfactory situation.  Mr. Wilkins had given his son an education and tastes beyond his position.  He could not associate with either profit or pleasure with the doctor or the brewer of Hamley; the vicar was old and deaf, the curate a raw young man, half frightened at the sound of his own voice.  Then, as to matrimony—­for the idea of his marriage was hardly more present in Edward’s mind than in that of his father—­he could scarcely fancy bringing home any one of the young ladies of Hamley to the elegant mansion, so full of suggestion and association to an educated person, so inappropriate a dwelling for an ignorant, uncouth, ill-brought-up girl.  Yet Edward was fully aware, if his fond father was not, that of all the young ladies who were glad enough of him as a partner at the Hamley assemblies, there was not of them but would have considered herself affronted by an offer of marriage from an attorney, the son and grandson of attorneys.  The young man had perhaps received many a slight and mortification pretty quietly during these years, which yet told upon his character in after life.  Even at this very time they were having their effect.  He was of too sweet a disposition to show resentment, as many men would have done.  But nevertheless he took a secret pleasure in the power which his father’s money gave him.  He would buy an expensive horse after five minutes’ conversation as to the price, about which a needy heir of one of the proud county families had been haggling for three weeks.  His dogs were from the best kennels in England, no matter at what cost; his guns were the newest and most improved make; and all these were expenses on objects which were among those of daily envy to the squires and squires’ sons around.  They did not much care for the treasures of art, which report said were being accumulated in Mr. Wilkins’s house.  But they did covet the horses and hounds he possessed, and the young man knew that they coveted, and rejoiced in it.

By-and-by he formed a marriage, which went as near as marriages ever do towards pleasing everybody.  He was desperately in love with Miss Lamotte, so he was delighted when she consented to be his wife.  His father was delighted in his delight, and, besides, was charmed to remember that Miss Lamotte’s mother had been Sir Frank Holster’s younger sister, and that, although her marriage had been disowned by her family, as beneath her in rank, yet no one could efface her name out of the Baronetage, where Lettice, youngest daughter of Sir Mark Holster, born 1772, married H. Lamotte, 1799, died 1810, was duly chronicled.  She had left two children, a boy and a girl, of whom their uncle, Sir Frank, took charge, as their father was worse than dead—­an outlaw whose name was never mentioned.  Mark Lamotte was in the army; Lettice had a dependent position in her uncle’s family; not intentionally made more dependent than was rendered necessary by circumstances, but still dependent enough to grate on the feelings

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A Dark Night's Work from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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