Moby Dick: or, the White Whale eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 623 pages of information about Moby Dick.

CHAPTER 128

The Pequod Meets The Rachel

Next day, a large ship, the Rachel, was descried, bearing directly down upon the Pequod, all her spars thickly clustering with men.  At the time the Pequod was making good speed through the water; but as the broad-winged windward stranger shot nigh to her, the boastful sails all fell together as blank bladders that are burst, and all life fled from the smitten hull.

“Bad news; she brings bad news,” muttered the old Manxman.  But ere her commander, who, with trumpet to mouth, stood up in his boat; ere he could hopefully hail, Ahab’s voice was heard.

“Hast seen the White Whale?”

“Aye, yesterday.  Have ye seen a whale-boat adrift?”

Throttling his joy, Ahab negatively answered this unexpected question; and would then have fain boarded the stranger, when the stranger captain himself, having stopped his vessel’s way, was seen descending her side.  A few keen pulls, and his boat-hook soon clinched the Pequod’s main-chains, and he sprang to the deck.  Immediately he was recognized by Ahab for a Nantucketer he knew.  But no formal salutation was exchanged.

“Where was he?—­not killed!—­not killed!” cried Ahab, closely advancing.  “How was it?”

It seemed that somewhat late on the afternoon of the day previous, while three of the stranger’s boats were engaged with a shoal of whales, which had led them some four or five miles from the ship; and while they were yet in swift chase to windward, the white hump and head of Moby Dick had suddenly loomed up out of the blue water, not very far to leeward; whereupon, the fourth rigged boat—­ a reserved one—­had been instantly lowered in chase.  After a keen sail before the wind, this fourth boat—­the swiftest keeled of all—­seemed to have succeeded in fastening—­at least, as well as the man at the mast-head could tell anything about it.  In the distance he saw the diminished dotted boat; and then a swift gleam of bubbling white water; and after that nothing more; whence it was concluded that the stricken whale must have indefinitely run away with his pursuers, as often happens.  There was some apprehension, but no positive alarm, as yet.  The recall signals were placed in the rigging; darkness came on; and forced to pick up her three far to windward boats—­ere going in quest of the fourth one in the precisely opposite direction—­ the ship had not only been necessitated to leave that boat to its fate till near midnight, but, for the time, to increase her distance from it.  But the rest of her crew being at last safe aboard, she crowded all sail—­stunsail on stunsail—­ after the missing boat; kindling a fire in her try-pots for a beacon; and every other man aloft on the look-out.  But though when she had thus sailed a sufficient distance to gain the presumed place of the absent ones when last seen; though she then paused to lower her spare boats to pull all around her; and not finding anything, had again dashed on; again paused, and lowered her boats; and though she had thus continued doing till daylight; yet not the least glimpse of the missing keel had been seen.

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Moby Dick: or, the White Whale from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.