Moby Dick: or, the White Whale eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 623 pages of information about Moby Dick.

The ribs were hung with trophies; the vertebrae were carved with Arsacidean annals, in strange hieroglyphics; in the skull, the priests kept up an unextinguished aromatic flame, so that the mystic head again sent forth its vapory spout; while, suspended from a bough, the terrific lower jaw vibrated over all the devotees, like the hair-hung sword that so affrighted Damocles.

It was a wondrous sight.  The wood was green as mosses of the Icy Glen; the trees stood high and haughty, feeling their living sap; the industrious earth beneath was as a weaver’s loom, with a gorgeous carpet on it, whereof the ground-vine tendrils formed the warp and woof, and the living flowers the figures.  All the trees, with all their laden branches; all the shrubs, and ferns, and grasses; the message-carrying air; all these unceasingly were active.  Through the lacings of the leaves, the great sun seemed a flying shuttle weaving the unwearied verdure.  Oh, busy weaver! unseen weaver!—­pause!—­one word!—­ whither flows the fabric? what palace may it deck? wherefore all these ceaseless toilings?  Speak, weaver!—­stay thy hand!—­ but one single word with thee!  Nay—­the shuttle flies—­ the figures float from forth the loom; the fresher-rushing carpet for ever slides away.  The weaver-god, he weaves; and by that weaving is he deafened, that he hears no mortal voice; and by that humming, we, too, who look on the loom are deafened; and only when we escape it shall we hear the thousand voices that speak through it.  For even so it is in all material factories.  The spoken words that are inaudible among the flying spindles; those same words are plainly heard without the walls, bursting from the opened casements.  Thereby have villainies been detected.  Ah, mortal! then, be heedful; for so, in all this din of the great world’s loom, thy subtlest thinkings may be overheard afar.

Now, amid the green, life-restless loom of that Arsacidean wood, the great, white, worshipped skeleton lay lounging—­a gigantic idler!  Yet, as the ever-woven verdant warp and woof intermixed and hummed around him, the mighty idler seemed the cunning weaver; himself all woven over with the vines; every month assuming greener, fresher verdure; but himself a skeleton.  Life folded Death; Death trellised Life; the grim god wived with youthful Life, and begat him curly-headed glories.

Now, when with royal Tranquo I visited this wondrous whale, and saw the skull an altar, and the artificial smoke ascending from where the real jet had issued, I marvelled that the king should regard a chapel as an object of vertu.  He laughed.  But more I marvelled that the priests should swear that smoky jet of his was genuine.  To and fro I paced before this skeleton—­ brushed the vines aside—­broke through the ribs—­and with a ball of Arsacidean twine, wandered, eddied long amid its many winding, shaded colonnades and arbors.  But soon my line was out; and following it back, I emerged from the opening where I entered.  I saw no living thing within; naught was there but bones.

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Moby Dick: or, the White Whale from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.