Moby Dick: or, the White Whale eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 623 pages of information about Moby Dick.
spiracle.  It is certain that the mouth indirectly communicates with the spouting canal; but it cannot be proved that this is for the purpose of discharging water through the spiracle.  Because the greatest necessity for so doing would seem to be, when in feeding he accidentally takes in water.  But the Sperm Whale’s food is far beneath the surface, and there he cannot spout even if he would.  Besides, if you regard him very closely, and time him with your watch, you will find that when unmolested, there is an undeviating rhyme between the periods of his jets and the ordinary periods of respiration.

But why pester one with all this reasoning on the subject?  Speak out!  You have seen him spout; then declare what the spout is; can you not tell water from air?  My dear sir, in this world it is not so easy to settle these plain things.  I have ever found your plain things the knottiest of all.  And as for this whale spout, you might almost stand in it, and yet be undecided as to what it is precisely.

The central body of it is hidden in the snowy sparkling mist enveloping it; and how can you certainly tell whether any water falls from it, when, always, when you are close enough to a whale to get a close view of his spout, he is in a prodigious commotion, the water cascading all around him.  And if at such times you should think that you really perceived drops of moisture in the spout, how do you know that they are not merely condensed from its vapor; or how do you know that they are not those identical drops superficially lodged in the spout-hole fissure, which is countersunk into the summit of the whale’s head?  For even when tranquilly swimming through the mid-day sea in a calm, with his elevated hump sun-dried as a dromedary’s in the desert; even then, the whale always carries a small basin of water on his head, as under a blazing sun you will sometimes see a cavity in a rock filled up with rain.

Nor is it at all prudent for the hunter to be over curious touching the precise nature of the whale spout.  It will not do for him to be peering into it, and putting his face in it.  You cannot go with your pitcher to this fountain and fill it, and bring it away.  For even when coming into slight contact with the outer, vapory shreds of the jet, which will often happen, your skin will feverishly smart, from the acridness of the thing so touching it.  And I know one, who coming into still closer contact with the spout, whether with some scientific object in view, or otherwise, I cannot say, the skin peeled off from his cheek and arm.  Wherefore, among whalemen, the spout is deemed poisonous; they try to evade it.  Another thing; I have heard it said, and I do not much doubt it, that if the jet is fairly spouted into your eyes, it will blind you.  The wisest thing the investigator can do then, it seems to me, is to let this deadly spout alone.

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Moby Dick: or, the White Whale from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.