Under Western Eyes eBook

Joseph M. Carey
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 332 pages of information about Under Western Eyes.

I turn over for the hundredth time the leaves of Mr. Razumov’s record, I lay it aside, I take up the pen—­and the pen being ready for its office of setting down black on white I hesitate.  For the word that persists in creeping under its point is no other word than “cynicism.”

For that is the mark of Russian autocracy and of Russian revolt.  In its pride of numbers, in its strange pretensions of sanctity, and in the secret readiness to abase itself in suffering, the spirit of Russia is the spirit of cynicism.  It informs the declarations of her statesmen, the theories of her revolutionists, and the mystic vaticinations of prophets to the point of making freedom look like a form of debauch, and the Christian virtues themselves appear actually indecent....  But I must apologize for the digression.  It proceeds from the consideration of the course taken by the story of Mr. Razumov after his conservative convictions, diluted in a vague liberalism natural to the ardour of his age, had become crystallized by the shock of his contact with Haldin.

Razumov woke up for the tenth time perhaps with a heavy shiver.  Seeing the light of day in his window, he resisted the inclination to lay himself down again.  He did not remember anything, but he did not think it strange to find himself on the sofa in his cloak and chilled to the bone.  The light coming through the window seemed strangely cheerless, containing no promise as the light of each new day should for a young man.  It was the awakening of a man mortally ill, or of a man ninety years old.  He looked at the lamp which had burnt itself out.  It stood there, the extinguished beacon of his labours, a cold object of brass and porcelain, amongst the scattered pages of his notes and small piles of books—­a mere litter of blackened paper—­dead matter—­without significance or interest.

He got on his feet, and divesting himself of his cloak hung it on the peg, going through all the motions mechanically.  An incredible dullness, a ditch-water stagnation was sensible to his perceptions as though life had withdrawn itself from all things and even from his own thoughts.  There was not a sound in the house.

Turning away from the peg, he thought in that same lifeless manner that it must be very early yet; but when he looked at the watch on his table he saw both hands arrested at twelve o’clock.

“Ah! yes,” he mumbled to himself, and as if beginning to get roused a little he took a survey of his room.  The paper stabbed to the wall arrested his attention.  He eyed it from the distance without approval or perplexity; but when he heard the servant-girl beginning to bustle about in the outer room with the samovar for his morning tea, he walked up to it and took it down with an air of profound indifference.

While doing this he glanced down at the bed on which he had not slept that night.  The hollow in the pillow made by the weight of Haldin’s head was very noticeable.

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Under Western Eyes from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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