Under Western Eyes eBook

Joseph M. Carey
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 332 pages of information about Under Western Eyes.

The lean new-comer made an eager half-turn.  “He will want to embrace me,” thought our young man with a deep recoil of all his being, while his limbs seemed too heavy to move.  But it was a groundless alarm.  He had to do now with a generation of conspirators who did not kiss each other on both cheeks; and raising an arm that felt like lead he dropped his hand into a largely-outstretched palm, fleshless and hot as if dried up by fever, giving a bony pressure, expressive, seeming to say, “Between us there’s no need of words.”  The man had big, wide-open eyes.  Razumov fancied he could see a smile behind their sadness.

“This is Razumov,” Sophia Antonovna repeated loudly for the benefit of the fat man, who at some distance displayed the profile of his stomach.

No one moved.  Everything, sounds, attitudes, movements, and immobility seemed to be part of an experiment, the result of which was a thin voice piping with comic peevishness—­

“Oh yes!  Razumov.  We have been hearing of nothing but Mr. Razumov for months.  For my part, I confess I would rather have seen Haldin on this spot instead of Mr. Razumov.”

The squeaky stress put on the name “Razumov—­Mr. Razumov” pierced the ear ridiculously, like the falsetto of a circus clown beginning an elaborate joke.  Astonishment was Razumov’s first response, followed by sudden indignation.

“What’s the meaning of this?” he asked in a stern tone.

“Tut!  Silliness.  He’s always like that.”  Sophia Antonovna was obviously vexed.  But she dropped the information, “Necator,” from her lips just loud enough to be heard by Razumov.  The abrupt squeaks of the fat man seemed to proceed from that thing like a balloon he carried under his overcoat.  The stolidity of his attitude, the big feet, the lifeless, hanging hands, the enormous bloodless cheek, the thin wisps of hair straggling down the fat nape of the neck, fascinated Razumov into a stare on the verge of horror and laughter.

Nikita, surnamed Necator, with a sinister aptness of alliteration!  Razumov had heard of him.  He had heard so much since crossing the frontier of these celebrities of the militant revolution; the legends, the stories, the authentic chronicle, which now and then peeps out before a half-incredulous world.  Razumov had heard of him.  He was supposed to have killed more, gendarmes and police agents than any revolutionist living.  He had been entrusted with executions.

The paper with the letters N.N., the very pseudonym of murder, found pinned on the stabbed breast of a certain notorious spy (this picturesque detail of a sensational murder case had got into the newspapers), was the mark of his handiwork.  “By order of the Committee.—­N.N.”  A corner of the curtain lifted to strike the imagination of the gaping world.  He was said to have been innumerable times in and out of Russia, the Necator of bureaucrats, of provincial governors, of obscure informers.  He lived between whiles, Razumov had heard, on the shores of the Lake of Como, with a charming wife, devoted to the cause, and two young children.  But how could that creature, so grotesque as to set town dogs barking at its mere sight, go about on those deadly errands and slip through the meshes of the police?

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Under Western Eyes from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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