Madame Bovary eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 342 pages of information about Madame Bovary.

Then he resumed, “She really has eyes that pierce one’s heart like a gimlet.  And that pale complexion!  I adore pale women!”

When he reached the top of the Arguiel hills he had made up his mind.  “It’s only finding the opportunities.  Well, I will call in now and then.  I’ll send them venison, poultry; I’ll have myself bled, if need be.  We shall become friends; I’ll invite them to my place.  By Jove!” added he, “there’s the agricultural show coming on.  She’ll be there.  I shall see her.  We’ll begin boldly, for that’s the surest way.”

Chapter Eight

At last it came, the famous agricultural show.  On the morning of the solemnity all the inhabitants at their doors were chatting over the preparations.  The pediment of the town hall had been hung with garlands of ivy; a tent had been erected in a meadow for the banquet; and in the middle of the Place, in front of the church, a kind of bombarde was to announce the arrival of the prefect and the names of the successful farmers who had obtained prizes.  The National Guard of Buchy (there was none at Yonville) had come to join the corps of firemen, of whom Binet was captain.  On that day he wore a collar even higher than usual; and, tightly buttoned in his tunic, his figure was so stiff and motionless that the whole vital portion of his person seemed to have descended into his legs, which rose in a cadence of set steps with a single movement.  As there was some rivalry between the tax-collector and the colonel, both, to show off their talents, drilled their men separately.  One saw the red epaulettes and the black breastplates pass and re-pass alternately; there was no end to it, and it constantly began again.  There had never been such a display of pomp.  Several citizens had scoured their houses the evening before; tri-coloured flags hung from half-open windows; all the public-houses were full; and in the lovely weather the starched caps, the golden crosses, and the coloured neckerchiefs seemed whiter than snow, shone in the sun, and relieved with the motley colours the sombre monotony of the frock-coats and blue smocks.  The neighbouring farmers’ wives, when they got off their horses, pulled out the long pins that fastened around them their dresses, turned up for fear of mud; and the husbands, for their part, in order to save their hats, kept their handkerchiefs around them, holding one corner between their teeth.

The crowd came into the main street from both ends of the village.  People poured in from the lanes, the alleys, the houses; and from time to time one heard knockers banging against doors closing behind women with their gloves, who were going out to see the fete.  What was most admired were two long lamp-stands covered with lanterns, that flanked a platform on which the authorities were to sit.  Besides this there were against the four columns of the town hall four kinds of poles, each bearing a small standard of greenish cloth, embellished with inscriptions in gold letters.

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Madame Bovary from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.