Madame Bovary eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 342 pages of information about Madame Bovary.

The chemist and the cure plunged anew into their occupations, not without sleeping from time to time, of which they accused each other reciprocally at each fresh awakening.  Then Monsieur Bournisien sprinkled the room with holy water and Homais threw a little chlorine water on the floor.

Felicite had taken care to put on the chest of drawers, for each of them, a bottle of brandy, some cheese, and a large roll.  And the druggist, who could not hold out any longer, about four in the morning sighed—­

“My word!  I should like to take some sustenance.”

The priest did not need any persuading; he went out to go and say mass, came back, and then they ate and hobnobbed, giggling a little without knowing why, stimulated by that vague gaiety that comes upon us after times of sadness, and at the last glass the priest said to the druggist, as he clapped him on the shoulder—­

“We shall end by understanding one another.”

In the passage downstairs they met the undertaker’s men, who were coming in.  Then Charles for two hours had to suffer the torture of hearing the hammer resound against the wood.  Next day they lowered her into her oak coffin, that was fitted into the other two; but as the bier was too large, they had to fill up the gaps with the wool of a mattress.  At last, when the three lids had been planed down, nailed, soldered, it was placed outside in front of the door; the house was thrown open, and the people of Yonville began to flock round.

Old Rouault arrived, and fainted on the Place when he saw the black cloth!

Chapter Ten

He had only received the chemist’s letter thirty-six hours after the event; and, from consideration for his feelings, Homais had so worded it that it was impossible to make out what it was all about.

First, the old fellow had fallen as if struck by apoplexy.  Next, he understood that she was not dead, but she might be.  At last, he had put on his blouse, taken his hat, fastened his spurs to his boots, and set out at full speed; and the whole of the way old Rouault, panting, was torn by anguish.  Once even he was obliged to dismount.  He was dizzy; he heard voices round about him; he felt himself going mad.

Day broke.  He saw three black hens asleep in a tree.  He shuddered, horrified at this omen.  Then he promised the Holy Virgin three chasubles for the church, and that he would go barefooted from the cemetery at Bertaux to the chapel of Vassonville.

He entered Maromme shouting for the people of the inn, burst open the door with a thrust of his shoulder, made for a sack of oats, emptied a bottle of sweet cider into the manger, and again mounted his nag, whose feet struck fire as it dashed along.

He said to himself that no doubt they would save her; the doctors would discover some remedy surely.  He remembered all the miraculous cures he had been told about.  Then she appeared to him dead.  She was there; before his eyes, lying on her back in the middle of the road.  He reined up, and the hallucination disappeared.

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Madame Bovary from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.