Madame Bovary eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 342 pages of information about Madame Bovary.

About the middle of October she could sit up in bed supported by pillows.  Charles wept when he saw her eat her first bread-and-jelly.  Her strength returned to her; she got up for a few hours of an afternoon, and one day, when she felt better, he tried to take her, leaning on his arm, for a walk round the garden.  The sand of the paths was disappearing beneath the dead leaves; she walked slowly, dragging along her slippers, and leaning against Charles’s shoulder.  She smiled all the time.

They went thus to the bottom of the garden near the terrace.  She drew herself up slowly, shading her eyes with her hand to look.  She looked far off, as far as she could, but on the horizon were only great bonfires of grass smoking on the hills.

“You will tire yourself, my darling!” said Bovary.  And, pushing her gently to make her go into the arbour, “Sit down on this seat; you’ll be comfortable.”

“Oh! no; not there!” she said in a faltering voice.

She was seized with giddiness, and from that evening her illness recommenced, with a more uncertain character, it is true, and more complex symptoms.  Now she suffered in her heart, then in the chest, the head, the limbs; she had vomitings, in which Charles thought he saw the first signs of cancer.

And besides this, the poor fellow was worried about money matters.

Chapter Fourteen

To begin with, he did not know how he could pay Monsieur Homais for all the physic supplied by him, and though, as a medical man, he was not obliged to pay for it, he nevertheless blushed a little at such an obligation.  Then the expenses of the household, now that the servant was mistress, became terrible.  Bills rained in upon the house; the tradesmen grumbled; Monsieur Lheureux especially harassed him.  In fact, at the height of Emma’s illness, the latter, taking advantage of the circumstances to make his bill larger, had hurriedly brought the cloak, the travelling-bag, two trunks instead of one, and a number of other things.  It was very well for Charles to say he did not want them.  The tradesman answered arrogantly that these articles had been ordered, and that he would not take them back; besides, it would vex madame in her convalescence; the doctor had better think it over; in short, he was resolved to sue him rather than give up his rights and take back his goods.  Charles subsequently ordered them to be sent back to the shop.  Felicite forgot; he had other things to attend to; then thought no more about them.  Monsieur Lheureux returned to the charge, and, by turns threatening and whining, so managed that Bovary ended by signing a bill at six months.  But hardly had he signed this bill than a bold idea occurred to him:  it was to borrow a thousand francs from Lheureux.  So, with an embarrassed air, he asked if it were possible to get them, adding that it would be for a year, at any interest he wished.  Lheureux ran off to his

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Madame Bovary from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.