Madame Bovary eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 342 pages of information about Madame Bovary.
where she used to burn the end of a bit of wood in the great flame of the sea-sedges!  She remembered the summer evenings all full of sunshine.  The colts neighed when anyone passed by, and galloped, galloped.  Under her window there was a beehive, and sometimes the bees wheeling round in the light struck against her window like rebounding balls of gold.  What happiness there had been at that time, what freedom, what hope!  What an abundance of illusions!  Nothing was left of them now.  She had got rid of them all in her soul’s life, in all her successive conditions of life, maidenhood, her marriage, and her love—­thus constantly losing them all her life through, like a traveller who leaves something of his wealth at every inn along his road.

But what then, made her so unhappy?  What was the extraordinary catastrophe that had transformed her?  And she raised her head, looking round as if to seek the cause of that which made her suffer.

An April ray was dancing on the china of the whatnot; the fire burned; beneath her slippers she felt the softness of the carpet; the day was bright, the air warm, and she heard her child shouting with laughter.

In fact, the little girl was just then rolling on the lawn in the midst of the grass that was being turned.  She was lying flat on her stomach at the top of a rick.  The servant was holding her by her skirt.  Lestiboudois was raking by her side, and every time he came near she lent forward, beating the air with both her arms.

“Bring her to me,” said her mother, rushing to embrace her.  “How I love you, my poor child!  How I love you!”

Then noticing that the tips of her ears were rather dirty, she rang at once for warm water, and washed her, changed her linen, her stockings, her shoes, asked a thousand questions about her health, as if on the return from a long journey, and finally, kissing her again and crying a little, she gave her back to the servant, who stood quite thunderstricken at this excess of tenderness.

That evening Rodolphe found her more serious than usual.

“That will pass over,” he concluded; “it’s a whim:” 

And he missed three rendezvous running.  When he did come, she showed herself cold and almost contemptuous.

“Ah! you’re losing your time, my lady!”

And he pretended not to notice her melancholy sighs, nor the handkerchief she took out.

Then Emma repented.  She even asked herself why she detested Charles; if it had not been better to have been able to love him?  But he gave her no opportunities for such a revival of sentiment, so that she was much embarrassed by her desire for sacrifice, when the druggist came just in time to provide her with an opportunity.

Chapter Eleven

He had recently read a eulogy on a new method for curing club-foot, and as he was a partisan of progress, he conceived the patriotic idea that Yonville, in order to keep to the fore, ought to have some operations for strephopody or club-foot.

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Project Gutenberg
Madame Bovary from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.