Critical and Historical Essays — Volume 1 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 877 pages of information about Critical and Historical Essays Volume 1.

We had intended to say something concerning that illustrious group of which Elizabeth is the central figure, that group which the last of the bards saw in vision from the top of Snowdon, encircling the Virgin Queen,

“Many a baron bold,
And gorgeous dames and statesmen old
In bearded majesty.”

We had intended to say something concerning the dexterous Walsingham, the impetuous Oxford, the graceful Sackville, the all-accomplished Sydney; concerning Essex, the ornament of the court and of the camp, the model of chivalry, the munificent patron of genius, whom great virtues, great courage, great talents, the favour of his sovereign, the love of his countrymen, all that seemed to ensure a happy and glorious life, led to an early and an ignominious death, concerning Raleigh, the soldier, the sailor, the scholar, the courtier, the orator, the poet, the historian, the philosopher, whom we picture to ourselves, sometimes reviewing the Queen’s guard, sometimes giving chase to a Spanish galleon, then answering the chiefs of the country party in the House of Commons, then again murmuring one of his sweet love-songs too near the ears of her Highness’s maids of honour, and soon after poring over the Talmud, or collating Polybius with Livy.  We had intended also to say something concerning the literature of that splendid period, and especially concerning those two incomparable men, the Prince of Poets, and the Prince of Philosophers, who have made the Elizabethan age a more glorious and important era in the history of the human mind than the age of Pericles, of Augustus, or of Leo.  But subjects so vast require a space far larger than we can at present afford.  We therefore stop here, fearing that, if we proceed, our article may swell to a bulk exceeding that of all other reviews, as much as Dr. Nares’s book exceeds the bulk of all other histories.

JOHN HAMPDEN

(December 1831)

Some Memorials of John Hampden, his Party, and his Times.  By lord Nugent.  Two vols. 8vo.  London:  1831.

We have read this book with great pleasure, though not exactly with that kind of pleasure which we had expected.  We had hoped that Lord Nugent would have been able to collect, from family papers and local traditions, much new and interesting information respecting the life and character of the renowned leader of the Long Parliament, the first of those great English commoners whose plain addition of Mister has, to our ears, a more majestic sound than the proudest of the feudal titles.  In this hope we have been disappointed; but assuredly not from any want of zeal or diligence on the part of the noble biographer.  Even at Hampden, there are, it seems, no important papers relating to the most illustrious proprietor of that ancient domain.  The most valuable memorials of him which still exist, belong to the family of his friend Sir John Eliot.  Lord Eliot has furnished the portrait which is engraved

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
Critical and Historical Essays — Volume 1 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
Follow Us on Facebook