History of Phoenicia eBook

George Rawlinson
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 429 pages of information about History of Phoenicia.

[Footnote 1016:  Plin. H.  N. xxxiii. 4, Sec. 21.]

[Footnote 1017:  Ibid. xxxiii. 4, Sec. 23.]

[Footnote 1018:  Diod.  Sic. v. 35, Sec. 1.]

[Footnote 1019:  Plin. H.  N. xxxiii. 6, Sec. 31.]

[Footnote 1020:  Ibid.  Sec. 96.]

[Footnote 1021:  Strab. iii. 2, Sec. 8; Diod.  Sic. v. 36, Sec. 2.]

[Footnote 1022:  Ap.  Strab. iii. 2, Sec. 9.  Compare Diod.  Sic. v. 38, Sec. 4.]

[Footnote 1023:  Strab. l.s.c.]

[Footnote 1024:  Plin. H.  N. xxxiv. 16, Sec. 156.]

[Footnote 1025:  Plin. H.  N. xxxiv. 16, Sec. 158 and Sec. 165.]

[Footnote 1026:  Polyb. xxxiv. 5, Sec. 11; Plin. H.  N. xxxiv. 16, Sec. 158.]

[Footnote 1027:  Plin. xxxiv. 18, Sec. 173.]

[Footnote 1028:  Ibid.  Sec. 159.]

[Footnote 1029:  Ibid. xxxiv. 17, Sec. 164.]

[Footnote 1030:  Quicksilver is still among the products of the Spanish mines, where its presence is noted by Pliny (H.  N. xxxiii. 6, Sec. 99).]

[Footnote 1031:  Diod.  Sic. v. 36, Sec. 2.]

[Footnote 1032:  Ibid. {Kai plagias kai skolias diaduseis poikilos metallourgountes}.]

[Footnote 1033:  Pliny says “flint,” but this can scarcely have been the material. (See Plin. H.  N. xxxiii. 4, Sec. 71.)]

[Footnote 1034:  Ibid.  Sec. 70.]

[Footnote 1035:  Ibid.  Sec. 73.]

[Footnote 1036:  Diod.  Sic. v. 37, Sec. 3.]

[Footnote 1037:  Diod.  Sic. v. 37, Sec. 3.  Compare Strab. iii. 2, Sec. 9.]

[Footnote 1038:  Plin. H.  N. xxxiii. 4, Sec. 69.]

[Footnote 1039:  Ibid.]

[Footnote 1040:  Kenrick, Phoenicia, p. 263.]

[Footnote 1041:  Diod.  Soc. v. 38, Sec. 1.]

[Footnote 1042:  Kenrick thinks that the Carthaginians “introduced the practice of working the mines by slave labour” (Phoenicia, l.s.c.); but to me the probability appears to be the other way.]

[Footnote 1043:  See Wilkinson, in the author’s Herodotus, ii. 504.]

[Footnote 1044:  Herod. iii. 96.]

XI—­RELIGION

[Footnote 0111:  Renan, Histoire des Langues Semitiques, p. 5.]

[Footnote 0112:  Ithobal, father of Jezebel, was High Priest of Ashtoreth (Menand.  Ephes.  Fr. 1).  Amastarte, the mother of Esmunazar II. (Records of the Past, ix. 113) was priestess of the same deity.]

[Footnote 0113:  As figures of Melkarth, or Esmun, or dedications to Baal, as lord of the particular city issuing it.]

[Footnote 0114:  Herod. iii. 37.]

[Footnote 0115:  For the fragments of the work which remain, see the Fragmenta Historicum Graecorum of C. Mueller, iii. 561-571.  Its value has been much disputed, but seems to the present writer only slight.]

[Footnote 0116:  Compare Max Mueller, Science of Religion, p. 177 et seqq.]

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