In the Carquinez Woods eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 145 pages of information about In the Carquinez Woods.

CHAPTER I.

The sun was going down on the Carquinez Woods.  The few shafts of sunlight that had pierced their pillared gloom were lost in unfathomable depths, or splintered their ineffectual lances on the enormous trunks of the redwoods.  For a time the dull red of their vast columns, and the dull red of their cast-off bark which matted the echoless aisles, still seemed to hold a faint glow of the dying day.  But even this soon passed.  Light and color fled upwards.  The dark interlaced treetops, that had all day made an impenetrable shade, broke into fire here and there; their lost spires glittered, faded, and went utterly out.  A weird twilight that did not come from the outer world, but seemed born of the wood itself, slowly filled and possessed the aisles.  The straight, tall, colossal trunks rose dimly like columns of upward smoke.  The few fallen trees stretched their huge length into obscurity, and seemed to lie on shadowy trestles.  The strange breath that filled these mysterious vaults had neither coldness nor moisture; a dry, fragrant dust arose from the noiseless foot that trod their bark-strewn floor; the aisles might have been tombs, the fallen trees enormous mummies; the silence the solitude of a forgotten past.

And yet this silence was presently broken by a recurring sound like breathing, interrupted occasionally by inarticulate and stertorous gasps.  It was not the quick, panting, listening breath of some stealthy feline or canine animal, but indicated a larger, slower, and more powerful organization, whose progress was less watchful and guarded, or as if a fragment of one of the fallen monsters had become animate.  At times this life seemed to take visible form, but as vaguely, as misshapenly, as the phantom of a nightmare.  Now it was a square object moving sideways, endways, with neither head nor tail and scarcely visible feet; then an arched bulk rolling against the trunks of the trees and recoiling again, or an upright cylindrical mass, but always oscillating and unsteady, and striking the trees on either hand.  The frequent occurrence of the movement suggested the figures of some weird rhythmic dance to music heard by the shape alone.  Suddenly it either became motionless or faded away.

There was the frightened neighing of a horse, the sudden jingling of spurs, a shout and outcry, and the swift apparition of three dancing torches in one of the dark aisles; but so intense was the obscurity that they shed no light on surrounding objects, and seemed to advance of their own volition without human guidance, until they disappeared suddenly behind the interposing bulk of one of the largest trees.  Beyond its eighty feet of circumference the light could not reach, and the gloom remained inscrutable.  But the voices and jingling spurs were heard distinctly.

“Blast the mare!  She’s shied off that cursed trail again.”

“Ye ain’t lost it again, hev ye?” growled a second voice.

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In the Carquinez Woods from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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