Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 122 pages of information about Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass.

Yet it is sad to think, that these very throbbing hearts which welcome your story, and form your best safeguard in telling it, are all beating contrary to the “statute in such case made and provided.”  Go on, my dear friend, till you, and those who, like you, have been saved, so as by fire, from the dark prison-house, shall stereotype these free, illegal pulses into statutes; and New England, cutting loose from a blood-stained Union, shall glory in being the house of refuge for the oppressed,—­till we no longer merely “hide the outcast,” or make a merit of standing idly by while he is hunted in our midst; but, consecrating anew the soil of the Pilgrims as an asylum for the oppressed, proclaim our welcome to the slave so loudly, that the tones shall reach every hut in the Carolinas, and make the broken-hearted bondman leap up at the thought of old Massachusetts.

God speed the day!

Till then, and ever, Yours truly, WENDELL PHILLIPS

FREDERICK DOUGLASS.

Frederick Douglass was born in slavery as Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey near Easton in Talbot County, Maryland.  He was not sure of the exact year of his birth, but he knew that it was 1817 or 1818.  As a young boy he was sent to Baltimore, to be a house servant, where he learned to read and write, with the assistance of his master’s wife.  In 1838 he escaped from slavery and went to New York City, where he married Anna Murray, a free colored woman whom he had met in Baltimore.  Soon thereafter he changed his name to Frederick Douglass.  In 1841 he addressed a convention of the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society in Nantucket and so greatly impressed the group that they immediately employed him as an agent.  He was such an impressive orator that numerous persons doubted if he had ever been a slave, so he wrote narrative of the life of Frederick Douglass.  During the Civil War he assisted in the recruiting of colored men for the 54th and 55th Massachusetts Regiments and consistently argued for the emancipation of slaves.  After the war he was active in securing and protecting the rights of the freemen.  In his later years, at different times, he was secretary of the Santo Domingo Commission, marshall and recorder of deeds of the District of Columbia, and United States Minister to Haiti.  His other autobiographical works are my bondage and my freedom and life and times of Frederick Douglass, published in 1855 and 1881 respectively.  He died in 1895.

CHAPTER I

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Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.