The Dark Flower eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 234 pages of information about The Dark Flower.

THE DARK FLOWER

Part I

Spring

I

He walked along Holywell that afternoon of early June with his short gown drooping down his arms, and no cap on his thick dark hair.  A youth of middle height, and built as if he had come of two very different strains, one sturdy, the other wiry and light.  His face, too, was a curious blend, for, though it was strongly formed, its expression was rather soft and moody.  His eyes—­dark grey, with a good deal of light in them, and very black lashes—­had a way of looking beyond what they saw, so that he did not seem always to be quite present; but his smile was exceedingly swift, uncovering teeth as white as a negro’s, and giving his face a peculiar eagerness.  People stared at him a little as he passed—­since in eighteen hundred and eighty he was before his time in not wearing a cap.  Women especially were interested; they perceived that he took no notice of them, seeming rather to be looking into distance, and making combinations in his soul.

Did he know of what he was thinking—­did he ever know quite definitely at that time of his life, when things, especially those beyond the immediate horizon, were so curious and interesting?—­the things he was going to see and do when he had got through Oxford, where everybody was ‘awfully decent’ to him and ‘all right’ of course, but not so very interesting.

He was on his way to his tutor’s to read an essay on Oliver Cromwell; and under the old wall, which had once hedged in the town, he took out of his pocket a beast.  It was a small tortoise, and, with an extreme absorption, he watched it move its little inquiring head, feeling it all the time with his short, broad fingers, as though to discover exactly how it was made.  It was mighty hard in the back!  No wonder poor old Aeschylus felt a bit sick when it fell on his head!  The ancients used it to stand the world on—­a pagoda world, perhaps, of men and beasts and trees, like that carving on his guardian’s Chinese cabinet.  The Chinese made jolly beasts and trees, as if they believed in everything having a soul, and not only being just fit for people to eat or drive or make houses of.  If only the Art School would let him model things ‘on his own,’ instead of copying and copying—­it was just as if they imagined it would be dangerous to let you think out anything for yourself!

He held the tortoise to his waistcoat, and let it crawl, till, noticing that it was gnawing the corner of his essay, he put it back into his pocket.  What would his tutor do if he were to know it was there?—­cock his head a little to one side, and say:  “Ah! there are things, Lennan, not dreamed of in my philosophy!” Yes, there were a good many not dreamed of by ‘old Stormer,’ who seemed so awfully afraid of anything that wasn’t usual; who seemed always laughing at you, for fear that you should laugh at him.  There were lots of people in Oxford like that.  It was stupid.  You couldn’t do anything decent if you were afraid of being laughed at!  Mrs. Stormer wasn’t like that; she did things because—­they came into her head.  But then, of course, she was Austrian, not English, and ever so much younger than old Stormer.

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Project Gutenberg
The Dark Flower from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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