Brother Jacob eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 50 pages of information about Brother Jacob.
for the office of prime minister; besides, in the present imperfectly-organized state of society, there are social barriers.  David could invent delightful things in the way of drop-cakes, and he had the widest views of the sugar department; but in other directions he certainly felt hampered by the want of knowledge and practical skill; and the world is so inconveniently constituted, that the vague consciousness of being a fine fellow is no guarantee of success in any line of business.

This difficulty pressed with some severity on Mr. David Faux, even before his apprenticeship was ended.  His soul swelled with an impatient sense that he ought to become something very remarkable—­that it was quite out of the question for him to put up with a narrow lot as other men did:  he scorned the idea that he could accept an average.  He was sure there was nothing average about him:  even such a person as Mrs. Tibbits, the washer-woman, perceived it, and probably had a preference for his linen.  At that particular period he was weighing out gingerbread nuts; but such an anomaly could not continue.  No position could be suited to Mr. David Faux that was not in the highest degree easy to the flesh and flattering to the spirit.  If he had fallen on the present times, and enjoyed the advantages of a Mechanic’s Institute, he would certainly have taken to literature and have written reviews; but his education had not been liberal.  He had read some novels from the adjoining circulating library, and had even bought the story of Inkle and Yarico, which had made him feel very sorry for poor Mr. Inkle; so that his ideas might not have been below a certain mark of the literary calling; but his spelling and diction were too unconventional.

When a man is not adequately appreciated or comfortably placed in his own country, his thoughts naturally turn towards foreign climes; and David’s imagination circled round and round the utmost limits of his geographical knowledge, in search of a country where a young gentleman of pasty visage, lipless mouth, and stumpy hair, would be likely to be received with the hospitable enthusiasm which he had a right to expect.  Having a general idea of America as a country where the population was chiefly black, it appeared to him the most propitious destination for an emigrant who, to begin with, had the broad and easily recognizable merit of whiteness; and this idea gradually took such strong possession of him that Satan seized the opportunity of suggesting to him that he might emigrate under easier circumstances, if he supplied himself with a little money from his master’s till.  But that evil spirit, whose understanding, I am convinced, has been much overrated, quite wasted his time on this occasion.  David would certainly have liked well to have some of his master’s money in his pocket, if he had been sure his master would have been the only man to suffer for it; but he was a cautious youth, and quite determined

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Brother Jacob from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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