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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 243 pages of information about King Solomon's Mines.

Accordingly, when the sun was up, the troops—­in all some twenty thousand men, and the flower of the Kukuana army—­were mustered on a large open space, to which we went.  The men were drawn up in three sides of a dense square, and presented a magnificent spectacle.  We took our station on the open side of the square, and were speedily surrounded by all the principal chiefs and officers.

These, after silence had been proclaimed, Infadoos proceeded to address.  He narrated to them in vigorous and graceful language—­for, like most Kukuanas of high rank, he was a born orator—­the history of Ignosi’s father, and of how he had been basely murdered by Twala the king, and his wife and child driven out to starve.  Then he pointed out that the people suffered and groaned under Twala’s cruel rule, instancing the proceedings of the previous night, when, under pretence of their being evil-doers, many of the noblest in the land had been dragged forth and wickedly done to death.  Next he went on to say that the white lords from the Stars, looking down upon their country, had perceived its trouble, and determined, at great personal inconvenience, to alleviate its lot:  That they had accordingly taken the real king of the Kukuanas, Ignosi, who was languishing in exile, by the hand, and led him over the mountains:  That they had seen the wickedness of Twala’s doings, and for a sign to the wavering, and to save the life of the girl Foulata, actually, by the exercise of their high magic, had put out the moon and slain the young fiend Scragga; and that they were prepared to stand by them, and assist them to overthrow Twala, and set up the rightful king, Ignosi, in his place.

He finished his discourse amidst a murmur of approbation.  Then Ignosi stepped forward and began to speak.  Having reiterated all that Infadoos his uncle had said, he concluded a powerful speech in these words:—­

“O chiefs, captains, soldiers, and people, ye have heard my words.  Now must ye make choice between me and him who sits upon my throne, the uncle who killed his brother, and hunted his brother’s child forth to die in the cold and the night.  That I am indeed the king these”—­ pointing to the chiefs—­“can tell you, for they have seen the snake about my middle.  If I were not the king, would these white men be on my side with all their magic?  Tremble, chiefs, captains, soldiers, and people!  Is not the darkness they have brought upon the land to confound Twala and cover our flight, darkness even in the hour of the full moon, yet before your eyes?”

“It is,” answered the soldiers.

“I am the king; I say to you, I am the king,” went on Ignosi, drawing up his great stature to its full, and lifting his broad-bladed battle-axe above his head.  “If there be any man among you who says that it is not so, let him stand forth and I will fight him now, and his blood shall be a red token that I tell you true.  Let him stand forth, I say;” and he shook the great axe till it flashed in the sunlight.

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