King Solomon's Mines eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 243 pages of information about King Solomon's Mines.

“Ye have the sign of the snake,” I answered.

“My lord, it is not enough.  The snake may have been placed there since the man’s childhood.  Show us a sign, and it will suffice.  But we will not move without a sign.”

The others gave a decided assent, and I turned in perplexity to Sir Henry and Good, and explained the situation.

“I think that I have it,” said Good exultingly; “ask them to give us a moment to think.”

I did so, and the chiefs withdrew.  So soon as they had gone Good went to the little box where he kept his medicines, unlocked it, and took out a note-book, in the fly-leaves of which was an almanack.  “Now look here, you fellows, isn’t to-morrow the 4th of June?” he said.

We had kept a careful note of the days, so were able to answer that it was.

“Very good; then here we have it—­’4 June, total eclipse of the moon commences at 8.15 Greenwich time, visible in Teneriffe—­South Africa, &c.’  There’s a sign for you.  Tell them we will darken the moon to-morrow night.”

The idea was a splendid one; indeed, the only weak spot about it was a fear lest Good’s almanack might be incorrect.  If we made a false prophecy on such a subject, our prestige would be gone for ever, and so would Ignosi’s chance of the throne of the Kukuanas.

“Suppose that the almanack is wrong,” suggested Sir Henry to Good, who was busily employed in working out something on a blank page of the book.

“I see no reason to suppose anything of the sort,” was his answer.  “Eclipses always come up to time; at least that is my experience of them, and it especially states that this one will be visible in South Africa.  I have worked out the reckonings as well as I can, without knowing our exact position; and I make out that the eclipse should begin here about ten o’clock tomorrow night, and last till half-past twelve.  For an hour and a half or so there should be almost total darkness.”

“Well,” said Sir Henry, “I suppose we had better risk it.”

I acquiesced, though doubtfully, for eclipses are queer cattle to deal with—­it might be a cloudy night, for instance, or our dates might be wrong—­and sent Umbopa to summon the chiefs back.  Presently they came, and I addressed them thus—­

“Great men of the Kukuanas, and thou, Infadoos, listen.  We love not to show our powers, for to do so is to interfere with the course of nature, and to plunge the world into fear and confusion.  But since this matter is a great one, and as we are angered against the king because of the slaughter we have seen, and because of the act of the Isanusi Gagool, who would have put our friend Ignosi to death, we have determined to break a rule, and to give such a sign as all men may see.  Come hither”; and I led them to the door of the hut and pointed to the red ball of the moon.  “What see ye there?”

“We see the sinking moon,” answered the spokesman of the party.

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King Solomon's Mines from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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