King Solomon's Mines eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 243 pages of information about King Solomon's Mines.

“How knowest thou this?”

“Listen.  They travelled on and on, many months’ journey, till they reached a land where a people called the Amazulu, who also are of the Kukuana stock, live by war, and with them they tarried many years, till at length the mother died.  Then the son Ignosi became a wanderer again, and journeyed into a land of wonders, where white people live, and for many more years he learned the wisdom of the white people.”

“It is a pretty story,” said Infadoos incredulously.

“For years he lived there working as a servant and a soldier, but holding in his heart all that his mother had told him of his own place, and casting about in his mind to find how he might journey thither to see his people and his father’s house before he died.  For long years he lived and waited, and at last the time came, as it ever comes to him who can wait for it, and he met some white men who would seek this unknown land, and joined himself to them.  The white men started and travelled on and on, seeking for one who is lost.  They crossed the burning desert, they crossed the snow-clad mountains, and at last reached the land of the Kukuanas, and there they found thee, O Infadoos.”

“Surely thou art mad to talk thus,” said the astonished old soldier.

“Thou thinkest so; see, I will show thee, O my uncle.

I am Ignosi, rightful king of the Kukuanas!

Then with a single movement Umbopa slipped off his “moocha” or girdle, and stood naked before us.

“Look,” he said; “what is this?” and he pointed to the picture of a great snake tattooed in blue round his middle, its tail disappearing into its open mouth just above where the thighs are set into the body.

Infadoos looked, his eyes starting nearly out of his head.  Then he fell upon his knees.

Koom!  Koom!” he ejaculated; “it is my brother’s son; it is the king.”

“Did I not tell thee so, my uncle?  Rise; I am not yet the king, but with thy help, and with the help of these brave white men, who are my friends, I shall be.  Yet the old witch Gagool was right, the land shall run with blood first, and hers shall run with it, if she has any and can die, for she killed my father with her words, and drove my mother forth.  And now, Infadoos, choose thou.  Wilt thou put thy hands between my hands and be my man?  Wilt thou share the dangers that lie before me, and help me to overthrow this tyrant and murderer, or wilt thou not?  Choose thou.”

The old man put his hand to his head and thought.  Then he rose, and advancing to where Umbopa, or rather Ignosi, stood, he knelt before him, and took his hand.

“Ignosi, rightful king of the Kukuanas, I put my hand between thy hands, and am thy man till death.  When thou wast a babe I dandled thee upon my knees, now shall my old arm strike for thee and freedom.”

“It is well, Infadoos; if I conquer, thou shalt be the greatest man in the kingdom after its king.  If I fail, thou canst only die, and death is not far off from thee.  Rise, my uncle.”

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Project Gutenberg
King Solomon's Mines from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.