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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 243 pages of information about King Solomon's Mines.

At sunset we halted, waiting for the moon to rise.  At last she came up, beautiful and serene as ever, and, with one halt about two o’clock in the morning, we trudged on wearily through the night, till at last the welcome sun put a period to our labours.  We drank a little and flung ourselves down on the sand, thoroughly tired out, and soon were all asleep.  There was no need to set a watch, for we had nothing to fear from anybody or anything in that vast untenanted plain.  Our only enemies were heat, thirst, and flies, but far rather would I have faced any danger from man or beast than that awful trinity.  This time we were not so lucky as to find a sheltering rock to guard us from the glare of the sun, with the result that about seven o’clock we woke up experiencing the exact sensations one would attribute to a beefsteak on a gridiron.  We were literally being baked through and through.  The burning sun seemed to be sucking our very blood out of us.  We sat up and gasped.

“Phew,” said I, grabbing at the halo of flies which buzzed cheerfully round my head.  The heat did not affect them.

“My word!” said Sir Henry.

“It is hot!” echoed Good.

It was hot, indeed, and there was not a bit of shelter to be found.  Look where we would there was no rock or tree, nothing but an unending glare, rendered dazzling by the heated air that danced over the surface of the desert as it dances over a red-hot stove.

“What is to be done?” asked Sir Henry; “we can’t stand this for long.”

We looked at each other blankly.

“I have it,” said Good, “we must dig a hole, get in it, and cover ourselves with the karoo bushes.”

It did not seem a very promising suggestion, but at least it was better than nothing, so we set to work, and, with the trowel we had brought with us and the help of our hands, in about an hour we succeeded in delving out a patch of ground some ten feet long by twelve wide to the depth of two feet.  Then we cut a quantity of low scrub with our hunting-knives, and creeping into the hole, pulled it over us all, with the exception of Ventvoegel, on whom, being a Hottentot, the heat had no particular effect.  This gave us some slight shelter from the burning rays of the sun, but the atmosphere in that amateur grave can be better imagined than described.  The Black Hole of Calcutta must have been a fool to it; indeed, to this moment I do not know how we lived through the day.  There we lay panting, and every now and again moistening our lips from our scanty supply of water.  Had we followed our inclinations we should have finished all we possessed in the first two hours, but we were forced to exercise the most rigid care, for if our water failed us we knew that very soon we must perish miserably.

But everything has an end, if only you live long enough to see it, and somehow that miserable day wore on towards evening.  About three o’clock in the afternoon we determined that we could bear it no longer.  It would be better to die walking that to be killed slowly by heat and thirst in this dreadful hole.  So taking each of us a little drink from our fast diminishing supply of water, now warmed to about the same temperature as a man’s blood, we staggered forward.

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