King Solomon's Mines eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 243 pages of information about King Solomon's Mines.

“‘Yes, Baas.’

“So I took a scrap of paper, and wrote on it, ’Let him who comes . . . climb the snow of Sheba’s left breast, till he reaches the nipple, on the north side of which is Solomon’s great road.’

“‘Now, Jim,’ I said, ’when you give this to your master, tell him he had better follow the advice on it implicitly.  You are not to give it to him now, because I don’t want him back asking me questions which I won’t answer.  Now be off, you idle fellow, the wagon is nearly out of sight.’

“Jim took the note and went, and that is all I know about your brother, Sir Henry; but I am much afraid—­”

“Mr. Quatermain,” said Sir Henry, “I am going to look for my brother; I am going to trace him to Suliman’s Mountains, and over them if necessary, till I find him, or until I know that he is dead.  Will you come with me?”

I am, as I think I have said, a cautious man, indeed a timid one, and this suggestion frightened me.  It seemed to me that to undertake such a journey would be to go to certain death, and putting other considerations aside, as I had a son to support, I could not afford to die just then.

“No, thank you, Sir Henry, I think I had rather not,” I answered.  “I am too old for wild-goose chases of that sort, and we should only end up like my poor friend Silvestre.  I have a son dependent on me, so I cannot afford to risk my life foolishly.”

Both Sir Henry and Captain Good looked very disappointed.

“Mr. Quatermain,” said the former, “I am well off, and I am bent upon this business.  You may put the remuneration for your services at whatever figure you like in reason, and it shall be paid over to you before we start.  Moreover, I will arrange in the event of anything untoward happening to us or to you, that your son shall be suitably provided for.  You will see from this offer how necessary I think your presence.  Also if by chance we should reach this place, and find diamonds, they shall belong to you and Good equally.  I do not want them.  But of course that promise is worth nothing at all, though the same thing would apply to any ivory we might get.  You may pretty well make your own terms with me, Mr. Quatermain; and of course I shall pay all expenses.”

“Sir Henry,” said I, “this is the most liberal proposal I ever had, and one not to be sneezed at by a poor hunter and trader.  But the job is the biggest I have come across, and I must take time to think it over.  I will give you my answer before we get to Durban.”

“Very good,” answered Sir Henry.

Then I said good-night and turned in, and dreamt about poor long-dead Silvestre and the diamonds.

CHAPTER III

UMBOPA ENTERS OUR SERVICE

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King Solomon's Mines from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.