Utopia of Usurers and Other Essays eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 99 pages of information about Utopia of Usurers and Other Essays.

I will take a Victorian instance to mark the change; as I did in the case of the advertisement of “Bubbles.”  It was said in my childhood, by the more apoplectic and elderly sort of Tory, that W. E. Gladstone was only a Free Trader because he had a partnership in Gilbey’s foreign wines.  This was, no doubt, nonsense; but it had a dim symbolic, or mainly prophetic, truth in it.  It was true, to some extent even then, and it has been increasingly true since, that the statesman was often an ally of the salesman; and represented not only a nation of shopkeepers, but one particular shop.  But in Gladstone’s time, even if this was true, it was never the whole truth; and no one would have endured it being the admitted truth.  The politician was not solely an eloquent and persuasive bagman travelling for certain business men; he was bound to mix even his corruption with some intelligible ideals and rules of policy.  And the proof of it is this:  that at least it was the statesman who bulked large in the public eye; and his financial backer was entirely in the background.  Old gentlemen might choke over their port, with the moral certainty that the Prime Minister had shares in a wine merchant’s.  But the old gentleman would have died on the spot if the wine merchant had really been made as important as the Prime Minister.  If it had been Sir Walter Gilbey whom Disraeli denounced, or Punch caricatured; if Sir Walter Gilbey’s favourite collars (with the design of which I am unacquainted) had grown as large as the wings of an archangel; if Sir Walter Gilbey had been credited with successfully eliminating the British Oak with his little hatchet; if, near the Temple and the Courts of Justice, our sight was struck by a majestic statue of a wine merchant; or if the earnest Conservative lady who threw a gingerbread-nut at the Premier had directed it towards the wine merchant instead, the shock to Victorian England would have been very great indeed.

Haloes for Employers

Now something very like that is happening; the mere wealthy employer is beginning to have not only the power but some of the glory.  I have seen in several magazines lately, and magazines of a high class, the appearance of a new kind of article.  Literary men are being employed to praise a big business man personally, as men used to praise a king.  They not only find political reasons for the commercial schemes—­that they have done for some time past—­they also find moral defences for the commercial schemers.  They describe the capitalist’s brain of steel and heart of gold in a way that Englishmen hitherto have been at least in the habit of reserving for romantic figures like Garibaldi or Gordon.  In one excellent magazine Mr. T. P. O’Connor, who, when he likes, can write on letters like a man of letters, has some purple pages of praise of Sir Joseph Lyons—­the man who runs those teashop places.  He incidentally brought in a delightful

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Utopia of Usurers and Other Essays from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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